2003-2004 Linguistics Courses

 

ANTH 240 Fall 2003
Language & Culture
Ellen Contini-Morava

A survey of topics having to do with the relationship between language, culture, and society. We will consider both how language is described and analyzed by linguists, and how data from languages are used in related fields as evidence of cultural, social, and cognitive phenomena. Topics include: nature of language, origins of language, how languages change, use of linguistic evidence to make inferences about prehistory, the effects of linguistic categories on thought and behavior, regional and social variation in language, and cultural rules for communication.

 

ANTH 343 Fall 2003
Introduction to Generative Linguistics
Lise Dobrin

An introductory course in linguistics for students interested in the study of language as a branch of cognitive science. We will adopt a view of language that has been highly influential in the field since the "generative revolution" led by Noam Chomsky in the mid-twentieth century, which uses a formal theory to explain how it is that "all normal children acquire essentially comparable grammars of great complexity with remarkable rapidity." Coursework will include readings and weekly problem sets in phonology (sound structure) and syntax (sentences). No prerequisites.

 

ANTH 401B Fall 2003
Senior Seminar: Language & Emotion
Daniel Lefkowitz

This course looks at the nexus of language, culture, and emotion, exploring the field of emotion from the perspective of cultural anthropology and sociolinguistics. Specific topics covered include: emotion in the natural vs. social sciences; cross-cultural conceptions of emotion; historical change in emotion discourses; emotion as a theory of the self; the grammatical encoding of emotion in language; (mis-) communication of emotion; and emotion and the construction of racialized and gendered identities.

 

ANTH 740 Fall 2003
Linguistic Anthropology
Daniel Lefkowitz

An advanced introduction to the study of language from an anthropological point of view. This course is designed to facilitate students' application of linguistic theories and methods in their own anthropologically oriented research. The field will be explored from twin perspectives: how the study of language can help address issues of cultural change and social dynamics, and how the study of social context can inform the description of linguistic and semiotic systems. Specific topics include core domains of linguistic analysis, language variation and change, language and nationalism, ethnopoetics and narrative, the structure of conversation, and the ethnography of communication. Through readings and discussion, the implications of each of these topics for the general conduct of anthropology will be addressed. Evaluation is based on seminar participation, problem sets and data collection/analysis projects assigned throughout the semester, and a research paper due at the end of the course. No prior linguistics coursework is expected.

 

ENLS 303/805 Fall 2003
History of the English Language
Hoyt Duggan

Studies the development of English word forms and vocabulary from Anglo-Saxon to present-day English; introduces the study of change in English from Old English to the present, emphasizing the literary language.

 

FREN 339 Fall 2003
French Phonetics
Gladys Saunders

Reviews pronunciation, phonetics, and phonology for undergraduates.

 

FREN 401/501 Fall 2003
Language Development
Roland Simon

Careful applied re-study of the structure of the French language based on recent theories of communication and meaning. Investigates, and makes practical use of, general notions regarding levels of language, semantic vs. lexical fields, meaning in situation, rhetorical figures and discourse, etc. All forms of communication are considered, including oral and visual signs.

 

*FREN 510L Fall 2003
Old French
Amy Ogden

Introduction to reading Old French, with consideration of its main dialects (Ile-de-France, Picard, Anglo-Norman). May be taken in conjunction with FREN 510 or independently. Weekly reading exercises and a final open-book exam. Prerequisite: good reading knowledge of modern French. Taught in English.

 

LNGS 292 Fall 2003
Language, Gender & Russian Society
Valentina Zaitseva

 

LNGS 325/701 Fall 2003
Introduction to Linguistic Theory and Analysis
Mark Elson

Introduces sign systems, language as a sign system, and approaches to linguistics. Emphasizes the application of descriptive techniques to data. (This course is a requirement for the BA and MA in Linguistics.)

 

LING 510 Fall 2003
Teaching Practicum ESL
Marion Ross

This course is designed individually for students who are actively teaching or tutoring students in English as a Second Language under the supervision of the Academic Director of the Center for American English Language and Culture (CAELC).

 

PSYC 585 Fall 2003
Language Development
Vikram Jaswal

Enrollment Restrictions: Graduate students or fourth-year Psychology, CogSci, or Linguistics majors, or instructor permission.
This seminar discussion will focus on how children learn the meanings of words. We will consider various theoretical debates, such as whether children acquire words through domain-general learning mechanisms or by mechanisms more specialized for word learning. We will also consider the extent to which word learning requires an ability to analyze other people's goals, intentions, and interests, and whether this helps to explain why language is specific to humans. Throughout, we will pay close attention to how children's early word learning interacts with and is influenced by their developing cognitive abilities. Coursework includes research proposal, occasional reaction papers, and student presentations (no exams).

 

RUSS 522 Fall 2003
The Structure of Modern Russian: Syntax and Semantics
Valentina Zaitseva

 

SAST 255 Fall 2003
Languages of South Asia
Peter Hook

An examination of the phonological morphological, and syntactic structures of South Asian languages from typological, social, and historical perspectives. This course presupposes no knowledge of a South Asian language and is intended for lower-level undergraduates. (This course will count toward the "structure" requirement for the Linguistics major and minor.)

 

SPAN 730 Fall 2003
History of the Language
Joel Rini

This course is intended to provide the student with an introduction to the history of the Spanish language and to familiarize the student with the structure of Old Spanish in order to facilitate the reading of Old Spanish texts. The point of departure for class lectures and discussions will be selected texts, most of which come directly from the MA reading list.

 

*SPAN 821 Fall 2003
Practicum in Teaching
Emily Scid
a
The goal of this course is to provide students with the opportunity to observe and apply new ideas and teaching principles through practical exercises and to develop their own personal theories of teaching through systematic reflection and experiment. Course activities will include class and group discussions, student presentations, teaching tasks, and writing assignments.

 

Spring 2004

AMEL 365/765 Spring 2004
Introduction to Linguistic Typology
Peter Hook

Human languages, especially those spoken by members of unfamiliar and distant cultures, appear on the surface to be very different from one another. But closer examination reveals that languages differ in systematic ways and that more than half of them can be divided into a relatively small number of basic types. In this course we will identify and study some of these basic patterns and explore possible reasons for their existence, seeking explanations where possible in the communicative function of language as well as in the historic evolution of languages. The course will introduce students to basic grammatical structure and function by (1) having them investigate unfamiliar languages through study of published descriptive grammars and (2) relating this direct experience to the principal findings of contemporary typological research. Intended for upper level undergraduates and graduate students.

 

ANTH 247 / AMEL 247 Spring 2004
Reflections of Exile: Jewish Languages & Their Communities
Daniel Lefkowitz

This course looks historically and comparatively at Jewish languages and the communities in which they have been used. We will explore general questions of the relationships among sociocultural groups, their languages (or language varieties), and the literatures they produce by reading about Yiddish, Ladino, and Judeo-Arabic from literary, cultural, and historical perspectives. No prior knowledge of these languages is required.

 

ANTH 333 Spring 2004
Ethnopoetics
Liliana Daskalova Perkowski

 

ANTH 341/741 Spring 2004
Sociolinguistics
Eve Danziger

This course is designed to introduce students to the foundations, concepts, and methods of sociolinguistics. Sociolinguistics takes as its focus the interaction between language and social life. The course will move from an examination of the conceptual foundations of sociolinguistics to an exploration of its scope and application in research. In addition to introducing students to basic terms and concepts of the field, we will conduct in-depth analyses and comparisons of ethnographies.

 

ANTH 347/747 / AMEL 347 Spring 2004
Language and Culture in the Middle East
Daniel Lefkowitz

This course provides an introduction to the people, cultures, and histories of the Middle East, through an examination of language-use in contemporary Middle Eastern societies. The course focuses on Israel/Palestine, and the contract between Hebrew and Arabic, as a microcosm providing insight into important social processessuch as colonization, religious fundamentalism, modernization, and the changing status of women affecting the region as a whole. Readings contrast ethnographic with novelistic representations of language, society, and identity. A primary concern will be to compare social scientific and literary constructions of "self" and "other" in the context of the political and military confrontation between Israel and Palestine. This is a lecture and discussion course. A number of feature films from the Middle East are incorporated into the course material. Requirements include three short essays, a book review, and a research paper.
Prerequisite: previous course in anthropology or Middle Eastern studies, or permission of the instructor.

 

ANTH 348 Spring 2004
Language and Prehistory
Eve Danziger

 

ANTH 504 Spring 2004
Linguistic Field Methods
Ellen Contini-Morava

Investigation of the grammatical structure of non-European language on the basis of data collected in class from a native speaker. A different language is the focus of study each year. (This course counts toward the language "structure" requirement for the B.A. and M.A.) Prerequisites: LNGS 325/701, ANTH 240, or permission of the instructor.

 

ANTH 541 Spring 2004
Phonology
Lise Dobrin

This introductory but fast-moving course teaches students with some linguistic background (1) to analyze and formally represent the organization of sound systems, and (2) to appreciate some of the central problems and methods of phonological theory. Students will apply what they are learning in weekly or biweekly problem sets.

 

ANTH 546 Spring 2004
Teaching English as a Second Language
Marion Ross

 

ANTH 549 Spring 2004
Discourse Analysis
Eve Danziger

 

ENLS 303/805 Spring 2004
History of the English Language
Hoyt Duggan

Studies the development of English word forms and vocabulary from Anglo-Saxon to present-day English; introduces the study of change in English from Old English to the present, emphasizing the literary language.

 

LING 509/ANTH 546 Spring 2004
Culture, Theory & Method of TESOL
Marion Ross

Prerequisite: LNGS 325 and instructor permission. Studies the theory, problems, and methods in teaching English as a second language, with attention to relevant areas of general linguistics and the structure of English.

 

LING 510 Spring 2004
Teaching Practicum ESL
Marion Ross

This course is designed individually for students who are actively teaching or tutoring students in English as a Second Language under the supervision of the Academic Director of the Center for American English Language and Culture (CAELC).

 

PHIL 550 Spring 2004
Philosophy of Language
Mitchell Green

Examines central conceptual problems raised by linguistic activity. Among topics considered are the relation between thought and language; the possibility of an essentially private discursive realm; the view that one's linguistic framework somehow structures reality; and the method of solving or dissolving philosophical problems by scrutiny of the language in which they are couched.

 

PSYC 555 Spring 2004
Developmental Psycholinguistics
John Bonvillian
Prerequisite: Upp
er-level psychology majors or linguistics students, or graduate students in Arts and Sciences or Education. Examines current research and theoretical models of children's language acquisition. Studies the normal acquisition of spoken language skills as well as the development of communication skills in deaf, autistic and other language-handicapped children.

 

SPAN 310 Spring 2004
Phonetics 
Emily Scida

This course consists of an in-depth analysis of the phonological system of Spanish, including both Peninsular and American varieties. Of equal importance are the theoretical (phonological) and practical (phonetic) aspects of the course. The aim of the course, therefore, is to provide the student with an understanding of phonological theory, while putting the theory into practice to improve the student's pronunciation.

 

SPAN 420 Spring 2004
History of Spanish
Emily Scida

The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to the evolution of the Spanish language, by examining the phonetic/phonological, morphological, syntactic, lexical, and semantic changes that occurred in the development of Latin to Spanish.

 

SPAN 730 Spring 2004
History of the Language
Joel Rini

This course is intended to provide the student with an introduction to the history of the Spanish language and to familiarize the student with the structure of Old Spanish in order to facilitate the reading of Old Spanish texts. The point of departure for class lectures and discussions will be selected texts, most of which come directly from the MA reading list.