2010-2011 Linguistics Courses

Fall 2010

AMST 2500 Language in the U.S.

Fall 2010
Ashley Williams 

MW 3:30-4:45

Contrary to popular belief, the U.S. is not (and never has been) linguistically homogenous: from dying and revitalized Native American languages to newly arrived immigrant languages, from regional and social dialect variation to innovation among adolescents and Hip Hop, the American language situation is diverse and changing. This course invites students to investigate this not-quite-melting-pot variety both through readings in current research and through small-scale field research. Topics covered in the course will include the origins and distinctions of American English, language controversies such as Ebonics and the English-Only movement, research in language attitudes and discrimination, topics in bilingualism and education, plus the latest studies in language issues involving different ethnicities, genders, sexualities, ages, and social classes. In this course we will pull material from a variety of sources (including films, literature, the media, and recent studies), and will employ a variety of approaches (linguistic, anthropological, sociological, historical, and more) as we investigate and debate what is uniquely “American” about the language situation in the United States. This course can be used to fulfill the Second Writing Requirement.

 

ANTH 2400 Language and Culture

Fall 2010
Lydia Rodriguez Cuevas
MWF 9-9:50

Introduces the interrelationships of linguistic, cultural, and social phenomena with emphasis on the importance of these interrelationships in interpreting human behavior. No prior knowledge of linguistics is required.

 

ANTH 2420 Language and Gender

Fall 2010
Ellen Contini-Morava 
MW 11-11:50 + discussion sections

Studies how differences in pronunciation, vocabulary choice, non-verbal communication, and/or communicative style serve as social markers of gender identity and differentiation in Western and non-Western cultures. Includes critical analysis of theory and methodology of social science research on gender and language.

 

ANTH 3450/7450 Native American Languages

Fall 2010
Eve Danziger
TR 2-3:15

This course in an introduction to the native languages of the Americas and to the methods that linguists and anthropologists have used to record and analyze them. It covers linguistic analysis and theory as a way into knowledge of languages very different from English and the frequently studied European languages. The methods of analysis learned should enable students to make intelligent use of linguistic materials on languages in other parts of the world as well. The native languages of the Americas are many, diverse and unevenly studied. Generalizations about them all can rarely be very meaningful or penetrating. The best way to gain a genuine sense of the subject is to become familiar with one of the languages . Such familiarity will give more than acquaintance with that particular language. It will give insight into the nature of the data and problems of the field as a whole (i.e. the field of study of languages which have been, for their speakers, unwritten.) To achieve this purpose, the course is designed so that each student will be working on a different language for which adequate published materials are available. The major assignments involve that work. Pre-requisite: LNGS 325 (3250) , LNGS 701 (7010) or ANTH 740 (7400). This course fulfills the Language Structure requirement for Linguistics majors and for Linguistics graduate students.

 

ANTH 3480/7480 Language and Prehistory

Fall 2010
Eve Danziger
TR 9:30-10:20 + discussion sections

This course covers the basic principles of diachronic linguistics - the study of how languages change over time - and discusses the uses of linguistic data in the reconstruction of prehistory. We will consider the use of linguistic evidence in tracing prehistoric population movements, in demonstrating contact among prehistoric groups, and in the reconstruction of daily life. To the extent that the literature permits, examples and case studies will be drawn from the Mayan language area of Central America, and will include discussion of the pre-Columbian Mayan writing system and its ongoing decipherment. This course fulfills the linguistics distribution requirement for Anthropology majors and for Cognitive Science majors. It also fulfills the Historical requirement for Linguistics.

 

ANTH 5420 Theories of Language

Fall 2010
Ellen Contini-Morava 
TR 12:30-1:45

We will survey a number of modern schools of linguistics, both American and European, trying to understand each approach in terms of its historical context, the goals it sets itself, the assumptions it makes about the nature of language, and the relation between theory and methodology. Grades will depend on: four or five written homework assignments that ask you to look at some data from a particular theoretical perspective; weekly reading responses, a take-home, open-book final exam; and evidence (from class discussion) that you have been doing the readings, which are an essential part of the course. Fulfills the Theory requirement for Linguistics.

 

ANTH 5549 Preservation of Language and Culture

Fall 2010
Lise Dobrin 
T 3:30-6

Students of language and culture today are engaged in an effort "to save what can yet be saved" of dying native life ways. But the meaning this project holds differs across participants and stakeholders. What values motivate and constrain the western "will to preserve"? How do these articulate with the interests of native people? This seminar explores these questions, taking contemporary documentary linguistics as a model.

 

*ENMD 5010 Introduction to Old English

Fall 2010
Peter Baker 

MWF 12-12:50

In this course, open to both undergraduates and graduates, you will learn to read the language of Beowulf—that is, the English language as preserved in sources from around 700 to 1100. After a brief introduction to the language (which is alarming at first glance but much easier to learn than any foreign language), readings will include prose excerpts from historical and religious sources and several verse classics, including The Battle of Maldon, The Wanderer, The Dream of the Rood, and The Wife's Lament. Work for the course includes bi-weekly quizzes, a brief final exam, and a short paper. This course is a prerequisite for Beowulf, offered in the spring term.

 

FREN 3030 Phonetics: The Sounds of French

Fall 2010
Gladys Saunders
TR 11-12:15

French 3030 is an introductory course in French phonetics, intended to present basic concepts in phonetic theory and teach students techniques for improving their own pronunciation. It includes an examination of the physical characteristics of individual French sounds, the relationship between these sounds and their written representations, the rules governing the pronunciation of “standard French”, the most salient phonological features of selected regional varieties (e.g. le français méridional), and much more. Taught in French. Counts for major credit in French and in Linguistics.

 

FREN 3509 The French-speaking World: An Introduction to Sociolinguistic Issues

Fall 2010
Gladys Saunders
TR 12:30-1:45

This course will explore a wide range of sociolinguistic issues relating to the French language and its role in societies around the world. Topics to be studied include: the diversity of the French-speaking world; the function of French in particular countries and regions (including Belgium, Canada, and Switzerland); the status of French in relation to other languages; individual language features; the "social meaning" of different styles and levels of language; French used by immigrants; and controversies affecting the French language, particularly in France itself. Requirements: group project; mid-term exam; term paper; attendance and daily oral participation. A sound knowledge of practical French is expected, but no prior knowledge of sociolinguistics is assumed. The course is normally taught exclusively in French. Some readings, however, will be done in English. If you are interested in this course but have concerns about your French level, please contact the instructor. Counts for major credit in French and Linguistics.

 

LING 5100 ESL Teaching Practicum

Fall 2010
Robb McCollum 
M 5:30-7:30

Through this course, student gain experience teaching English language pronunciation to international students, faculty, and staff at the
University. The Linguistics instructor provides pronunciation training, and then LING 5100 students lead application practice in small groups. This experience is an excellent introduction to teaching English as a second language as well as applied pronunciation training. Pre/Corequisite: LNGS 3250 and instructor permission. This course meets at the same time/room as ESL 0905.

 

LNGS 3250/7010 Introduction to Linguistic Theory and Methodology

Fall 2010 
Mark Elson
MWF 11-11:50

This course introduces sign systems, language as a sign system, and approaches to linguistic analysis which reflect this understanding of language (i.e., approaches which are sign-based, thus giving attention to meaning and communicative function as well as form). The analytic focus is the application of descriptive techniques to data from a variety of languages. There is an optional one-credit discussion (i.e., a fourth meeting) which students are encouraged to take. This course is a requirement for the BA and MA in Linguistics. Graduate students should enroll in LNGS 7010, which meets concurrently with 3250, and for which instructor permission is required.

 

PSYC 5310 Developmental Psycholinguistics

Fall 2010 
John Bonvillian 
TR 11-12:15

Examines current research and theoretical models of children's language acquisition. Topics include normal children's acquisition of spoken language skills, and the development of communication skills in deaf, autistic, and other groups of language-handicapped children. Prerequisite: Upper-level psychology major or linguistics student, or graduate student in Arts and Sciences or Education.

 

SPAN 3000 Phonetics

Fall 2010 
Joel Rini
TR 3-4:15; MWF 9-9:50

This course consists of an in-depth analysis of the phonological system of Spanish, including both Peninsular and American varieties. Of equal importance are the theoretical (phonological) and practical (phonetic) aspects of the course. The aim of the course, therefore, is to provide the student with an understanding of phonological theory, while putting the theory into practice to improve the student's pronunciation.Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 2020. Instructor permission required to enroll.

 

SPAN 3200 Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics

Fall 2010
Joel Rini
MWF 12-12:50

This course offers an introduction to the formal study of the Spanish language. Topics include: articulatory phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics. Prerequisite: SPAN 3020.

 

SPAN 7220 History of the Spanish Language

Fall 2010
Joel Rini 
TR 12:30-1:45

This course is intended to provide the student with an introduction to the history of the Spanish language and to familiarize the student with the structure of Old Spanish in order to facilitate the reading of Old Spanish texts. The point of departure for class lectures and discussions will be selected texts, most of which come directly from the Spanish M.A. reading list. The grade will be based on several in-class exams.

 

Spring 2011

AMST 2500-02 Chinese American Language, Culture, and Identity

Spring 2011

Ashley Williams
MW 3:30-4:45

Historically, the identity of those who are ethnically Chinese and live in the United States has continuously evolved as they experienced both discrimination and acceptance. Language has often been an important part of this development – whether a monolingual Chinese immigrant, bilingual 2nd generation Chinese American, or English-speaking American-born Chinese, what language an individual speaks in a Chinese American community often places him or her in a particular category. How exactly do identity and language influence each other, and how does culture change as a result? What makes someone identify as Chinese, Chinese American or American?

Pulling material from a variety of sources including films, literature, the media, and recent studies, we will employ linguistic, anthropological, sociological and historical approaches to investigate this intersection between identity, language, and culture. While we will focus primarily on the language and history of the ethnically Chinese in the U.S., we will also consider other Asian/ Pacific American groups, and student projects can also vary accordingly (and as such, this course makes no assumptions about studentsʼ knowledge of Asian/ Pacific American Studies, history, or linguistics). By studying a combination of the social meanings, perceived expectations, and historical and contemporary presumptions involved in communitiesʼ and individualsʼ levels of language and identity, we will come to a better understanding of what it means to be “American” in the context of todayʼs multilingual/ multicultural society and current global political climate. This course can be used to fulfill the Second Writing Requirement.

 

ANTH 2400 Language and Culture

Spring 2011

Ellen Contini-Morava
MWF 11-11:50 + obligatory discussion section

A survey of topics having to do with the relationship between language, culture, and society. We will consider both how language is described and analyzed by linguists and how evidence from language can shed light on a variety of social, cultural, and cognitive phenomena. Topics include: nature of language, origins of language, how languages change, writing systems, use of linguistic evidence to make inferences about prehistory, the effects of linguistic categories on thought and behavior, regional and social variation in language, and cultural rules for communication. Satisfies the College Non-Western perspectives requirement.

 

ANTH 2430 Languages of the World

Spring 2011

Lise Dobrin
MW 10-10:50 + obligatory discussion section

This course introduces students to the diversity of human language and the principles of linguistic classification. How many languages are spoken in the world, and how are they related? What features do all languages share, and in what ways may they differ? In surveying the world's languages, we will focus on the structure and social situation of a set of representative languages for each geographic region covered. We will also discuss the global trend of shift from the use of minority languages to large languages of wider communication, and what this means for the future of human diversity. Course work includes problem sets, essays, and a final paper on the linguistic features and social situation of a minor language. Prerequisites: one year of a foreign language or permission of instructor.

 

ANTH 2559 Narrative and Social Life

Spring 2011

Frank Bechter
MW 1-1:50 + obligatory discussion section

From Arabian Nights to Star Wars to presidential campaigning, telling a good story that people can project themselves into is at the center of cultural life. But narrative goes well beyond entertainment and conscious identification. It shapes the way we see. It is also just one form of social representation that does so. This course examines the social-interactive nature of narrative, and considers how forms of narrative produce and can also challenge cultural meaning. To understand the power of narrative, we survey key analytic approaches, several non-Western contexts, and some activities not typically associated with narrative. Students will apply concepts such as textuality, voicing, and genre in field projects covering a range of narrative situations.

 

ANTH 5401 Linguistic Field Methods

Spring 2011

Ellen Contini-Morava
M 5-7:30

In this course we will work with a native speaker of an "exotic" language (i.e., a language that is not commonly taught in the U.S., hence likely not to be familiar to any of the students in the class). We try to figure out the phonological and grammatical structure of the language based on data collected from the native speaker consultant in class. Attendance is therefore mandatory. Assignments include one paper on phonology, one on morphology, and one on syntax (the nature of the assignment may vary depending on the particular language being studied). Satisfies the Structure of a Language requirement for Linguistics.

 

ANTH 5440 Morphology

Spring 2011

Lise Dobrin
T 3:30-6

In this course we approach the study of morphology theoretically. The issues covered fall mainly into two broad groupings: those that relate word structure to phonology (such as allomorphy and word formation), and those that relate it to syntax (e.g., inflection, distinguishing compounds from phrases). Throughout the course we will be mindful of whether there exists a core set of phenomena having to do with word structure which motivates a distinct morphological component of grammar. Coursework involves biweekly problem sets and active participation in class problem solving and discussion. Some familiarity with linguistic analysis (such as LNGS 3250) is strongly recommended. Course fulfills the Theory requirement for Linguistics.

 

ANTH 7400 Linguistic Anthropology

Spring 2011

Eve Danziger
R 1-3:30

This is an advanced introduction to the study of language from an anthropological point of view. No prior coursework in linguistics is expected, but the course is aimed at graduate students who will use what they learn in their own anthropologically oriented research. Topics include an introduction to such basic concepts in linguistic anthropology as language in perception and world-view, the nature of symbolic meaning, universals and particulars in language, language in history and prehistory, the ethnography of speaking, the nature of everyday conversation, and the study of poetic language. Through readings and discussion, the implications of each of these topics for the general conduct of anthropology will be addressed. Evaluation is based on take-home essays and problem-sets which are assigned throughout the semester. The course is required for Anthropology graduate students. It fulfills the Theory requirement for graduate students in Linguistics.

 

EDHS 5020 Introduction to Speech and Hearing Science

Spring 2011

Filip Loncke
M 10-12:45

This course explores the basis of (1) speech production, (2) acoustics, (3) sound perception, and (4) speech perception. We analyze the physical characteristics of sound and human speech and how these relate to anatomical, physiological, and cognitive features.

 

EDIS 7850 English Language Learners: Theory, Policy, and Practice

Spring 2011

Amanda Kibler
M 10-12:45

This course will provide an overview of theoretical, policy-related, and pedagogical issues related to the education of linguistic minorities, with a focus on the U.S. context. Readings will address second language acquisition and theories of language learning, past and present educational language policies that affect minorities, the effectiveness of various program models used to educate language minorities, and language minority students and their teachers' language and literacy practices inside and outside of classrooms. Students will be expected to participate actively in seminar discussions and develop their own project related to the course topic.

 

FREN 4020 History of the French Language

Spring 2011

Gladys Saunders
TR 11-12:15

This course will look at some of the ways in which the French language has changed through time with respect to vocabulary, grammar, pronunciation, orthography, meaning, discourse, and the like. Social, cultural, political, environmental, as well as purely linguistic factors that have played some part in language change will be considered. Our approach will be non-traditional and somewhat novel. We begin with an inventory of penetrating questions, for example: why does one say ‘cheval’ in the singular but ‘chevaux’ in the plural (and cf. ‘animal ~ animaux'; but ‘vache ~ vaches’); or why did ”nos ancêtres les Gaulois” ‘bequeath’ so few of their words to the French lexicon; or why does the utterance “t’as pas dix balles?” immediately strike you as being ‘non-standard’-- and when was the language conventionalized anyway? Answers to such questions will provide the impetus for a more in-depth study and discussion of some of the major (underlying) diachronic changes and currents in the language. Prerequisites: good reading, writing and speaking ability in French. Previous course work in phonetics, historical linguistics, and other Romance languages helpful. Course conducted in French.

 

LING 5090 TESOL Theory and Practice

Spring 2011

Robb McCollum
TR 12:30-1:45

This course provides an introduction to theories of second language acquisition (SLA), as well as methods and materials for Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL). Students will be required to investigate current issues in the field of TESOL and SLA, and to apply their learning to language learning observations and volunteering tutoring experiences. Recommended pre-/co-requisite: LNGS 3250.

 

LING 5100 ESL Teaching Practicum

Spring 2011

Robb McCollum
M 5:30-7:30

Through this one-credit course, student gain experience teaching English language pronunciation to international students, faculty, and staff at the University. The Linguistics instructor provides pronunciation training, and then LING 5100 students lead applied practice with small groups. This experience is an excellent introduction to teaching English as a second language as well as applied pronunciation training. Recommended pre/corequisites: LNGS 3250 and instructor permission. This course meets at the same time/room as ESL 0905.

 

LNGS 2220 Black English/ LNGS 7220 History and Structure of Black English

Spring 2011

Mark Elson
MW 11-11:50 + obligatory discussion sections

An introduction to the history and structure of Black English. The primary goal of this course is to introduce students to the phonology and grammar (morphology and syntax) of what has been termed Black English Vernacular or African American Vernacular English. We will also be concerned with the external and sociolinguistic factors which led to the emergence of this variety of English, as well as its present role in the African-American community and its relevance in education, employment, and racial stereotypes. No prerequisites, but some background in linguistics (e.g., ANTH 2400, LING 3250) will be helpful.

 

LNGS 5000 Applied Linguistics for Teachers of Foreign Languages

Spring 2011

Mark Elson
MWF 8:30-9:45

This course considers basic linguistic concepts relating to sound, grammar, stylistics, and their application to the teaching of foreign languages as well as English as a second language. Its goal is to provide prospective teachers with background which will enable them to do research in the pedagogy and structure of their target languages, and to make informed decisions about how to undertake the development of communicative competence in their students.

 

PHIL 5450 Language and Logic

Spring 2011

Mitch Green
TR 9:30-10:45

This course will examine, with the aid of classical readings, and technical work in formal semantics and pragmatics, topics that have received the most intensive treatment in the field. These include the relation of truth to meaning; sense and reference; the relation of thought to language; speech acts, presupposition and implicature; the relation of conventional meaning to what is communicated in a given utterance. Requirements include two papers, active participation in class discussion, problem sets, and a final examination. Prerequisite: At least one course in symbolic logic (PHIL 2420 or equivalent). This is a designated course for Cognitive Science, and satisfies the Theory requirement for Linguistics.

 

PSYC 4110 Psycholinguistics

Spring 2011

Filip Loncke
T 3:30-6

This course focuses on the psychological processes that underlie the acquisition and the use of language. There is an emphasis on the interaction between linguistic skills and other cognitive skills. The course also looks at flexibility of language and language use, and the influence of psycholinguistic processes on reading and writing, the social use of language, and language in other modalities.

 

PSYC 4111 Language Development and Disorders

Spring 2011

John Bonvillian
TR 11-12:15

This course examines the development of language and communication skills from a variety of perspectives. In addition to studying the acquisition of spoken language in typically developing children, we will review the acquisition of spoken and signed languages in deaf children, children with autism, children with specific language impairment, and children with intellectual disabilities. We will also examine the acquisition of language-like communication skills in nonhuman primates. This course is not open to students who have taken PSYC 5310.

 

PSYC 4120 Psychology of Reading

Spring 2011

Beverly Colwell Adams
W 3:30-6

For psychologists who study reading, it sometimes amazes us that most literate people do not think much about the reading process. If you ask the typical person about how reading works, a typical response is that "it just does. I look at words on a page and then the sounds come out of my mouth. You might also hear, "I do not know how I do it, but for as long as I can remember I could do it." Under certain circumstances, however, a deeper level of evaluation is forthcoming and people report that it is a very complicated process. Listening to someone who has some type of reading impairment, observing young children as they are learning to read, wondering about the meaning of a passage (Did the main character insult a minor character or was it the other way around?), debating the pronunciation of a word (greasy, Roanoke, Staunton, theater, insurance), or reading a passage in a second language, readers make evaluations/decisions during the reading process. The focus of this class is the study of the reading process; what happens when we process the squiggles on the page to meaningful information that we can use. This includes word processing, sentence processing, speed-reading, text comprehension, etc. All of this is related to how the brain works and how we think. We will read basic/historical information from texts, review recent psychological research articles, and consider some hands-on experiences related to the reading process. The course is an interesting mix of experimental & cognitive psychology and structural linguistics, as well as psychoneurology, phonetics, anthropology, sociology, and education.

 

SPAN 3000 Phonetics

Spring 2011

Omar Velázquez-Mendoza
MWF 9-9:50

This course provides an introduction to the sound system of both Peninsular and Latin American Spanish. It describes how the sounds of Spanish are produced from an articulatory point of view, and how these sounds are organized and represented in the linguistic competence of Spanish speakers. When appropriate, comparisons will be made between Spanish and English or Spanish and other (Romance) languages. This course seeks to improve the students’ pronunciation. Conducted in Spanish.

 

SPAN 3000 Phonetics

Spring 2011

Joel Rini
MWF 11-11:50

This course consists of an in-depth analysis of the phonological system of Spanish, including both Peninsular and American varieties. Of equal importance are the theoretical (phonological) and practical (phonetic) aspects of the course. The aim of the course, therefore, is to provide the student with an understanding of phonological theory, while putting the theory into practice to improve the student’s pronunciation. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 3010.

 

SPAN 3200 Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics

Spring 2011

Emily Scida
MWF 12-12:50

What does it mean when we say we “know” a language? What knowledge do we have of the language(s) we speak? How do those pieces work together in a linguistic system? These are some of the fascinating questions that linguists investigate and that we will work on together as we begin to think like linguists. I invite you to join me in the exciting discovery of language as applied specifically to Spanish as we explore the sound system, word formation, sentence structure, language changes, and language variation of the Spanish language. Together we will discover how language and linguistics are an integrated part of our everyday lives. Students will be assessed on their participation, reflective writing, problem sets, presentation, and exams. Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 or equivalent. Counts for major credit in Spanish and in Linguistics. Conducted in Spanish.

 

SPAN 4201 Hispanic Dialectology and Bilingualism

Spring 2011

Omar Velázquez-Mendoza
MWF 12-12:50

This course focuses on the geographical distribution of the main dialectal varieties of modern Spanish from a phonological point of view (and, to a lesser degree, also from a lexical and a morphosyntactic perspective). It presents some of the ongoing bilingual contacts between Spanish and other languages and, in general terms, it discusses the historical phenomena that shaped the current geographical distribution of the modern Spanish varieties spoken across the Hispanic World. Conducted in Spanish. Course fulfills the Historical requirement for Linguistics. Prerequisites: SPAN 3000 or 3200, or departmental placement.

 

SPAN 4200 History of the Spanish Language

Spring 2011

Joel Rini
MWF 1-1:50

The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to the evolution of the Spanish language, by examining the phonetic/phonological, morphological, syntactic, lexical, and semantic changes that occurred in the development of Latin to Spanish. Conducted in Spanish.

 

SPAN 4202 Hispanic Sociolinguistics

Spring 2011

Omar Velázquez-Mendoza
MWF 10-10:50

This course examines the Spanish language within its social context by exploring—among others—the following topics: language versus dialect; the standard language; linguistic variation and its main variables: geography, style, gender, age, etc.; grammaticalization as a social process; language variation and language change; language contact and biligualism; code switching. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 3200 and 3010, or 3000 and 3010, or departmental placement.

 

SPAN 4530 Second Language Acquisition

Spring 2011

Emily Scida
MW 2-3:15

How do people learn a second language? How are first language acquisition and second language acquisition different? Why are some learners more successful than others in learning a second language? How does one measure “success” in second language acquisition? How do we define “competence”? I invite you to join me in the exploration of these and other exciting questions. Together we will discover the processes and mechanisms that drive language acquisition by studying how three different areas – linguistics, psychology, and sociocultural perspectives – have contributed to the major theories and ideas informing the field of Second Language Acquisition. Students will be assessed on their participation, reflective writing, 2 papers, presentation, and quizzes. Prerequisites: SPAN 3010, and SPAN 3000 or SPAN 3200 or another course in linguistics. Counts for major credit in Spanish and in Linguistics. Conducted in Spanish.