2012-2013 Linguistics Courses

Mon, 07/21/2014 - 22:12 -- manager

Fall 2012

AMST 2500 Language in the U.S.

Fall 2012

Ashley Williams
MW 3:30-4:45

Contrary to popular belief, the U.S. is not (and never has been) linguistically homogenous: from dying and revitalized Native American languages to newly arrived immigrant languages, from regional and social dialect variation to innovation among adolescents and Hip Hop, the American language situation is diverse and changing. This course invites students to investigate this not-quite-melting-pot variety both through readings in current research and through small-scale field research. Topics covered in the course will include the origins and distinctions of American English, language controversies such as Ebonics and the English-Only movement, research in language attitudes and discrimination, topics in bilingualism and education, plus the latest studies in language issues involving different ethnicities, genders, sexualities, ages, and social classes. In this course we will pull material from a variety of sources (including films, literature, the media, and recent studies), and will employ a variety of approaches (linguistic, anthropological, sociological, historical, and more) as we investigate and debate what is uniquely “American” about the language situation in the United States. Fulfills the Second Writing Requirement.

 

ANTH 1401 Your Heritage Language

​Fall 2012

Lise Dobrin
TR 2-3:15

This course introduces students to the fields of structural linguistics, social approaches to the study of language, and language policy through a focus on the traditional or heritage languages spoken more or less actively within students' own families and home communities. While heritage languages may continue to be transmitted, they often do so in a partial and socially muted way that leads to their eventual loss: they may be used only privately in the home, or with a reduced expressive range and set of functions, or exclusively in an oral medium. The lack of visibility and public acceptance of the many heritage languages that surround us submerges the full range of linguistic practices beneath a powerful monolingual norm. So in this course, we prepare students to draw upon linguistic diversity as a positive resource in developing their own identities and interacting with others in our multicultural society. Especially suited for 1st and 2nd year students. 
 

ANTH 2400 Language and Culture

​Fall 2012

Michael Wairungu
MWF 12-12:50

Introduces the interrelationships of linguistic, cultural, and social phenomena with emphasis on the importance of these interrelationships in interpreting human behavior.
 

ANTH 2420 Language and Gender

​Fall 2012

Ellen Contini-Morava
MW 11-11:50 + obligatory discussion section

In many societies, differences in pronunciation, vocabulary choice, and/or communicative style serve as social markers of gender identity and differentiation. We will compare gender differences in our own society with those in other societies including non-Western ones. Topics to be addressed include: the relation between gender difference and gender inequality (in scholarly discussion of language as well as in language itself); intersection of gender, race, and social class in language use; gender and non-verbal communication (including representations of gender in advertising and the media); issues of nature vs. nurture in explaining these differences. Requirements will include a paper based on fieldwork conducted jointly with a working group, an individual paper, participation in the required discussion section, and a take-home essay question exam focusing on the course readings and lectures.

 

ANTH 3480/7480 Language and Prehistory

​Fall 2012

Eve Danziger
TR 2-3:15 + obligatory discussion section

This course covers the basic principles of diachronic linguistics - the study of how languages change over time - and discusses the uses of linguistic data in the reconstruction of prehistory. We will consider the use of linguistic evidence in tracing prehistoric population movements, in demonstrating contact among prehistoric groups, and in the reconstruction of daily life. To the extent that the literature permits, examples and case studies will be drawn from the Mayan language area of Central America, and will include discussion of the pre-Columbian Mayan writing system and its ongoing decipherment. This course fulfills the linguistics distribution requirement for Anthropology majors and for Cognitive Science majors. It also fulfills the Historical requirement for the Linguistics BA and MA.

 

ANTH 3541/7541 Discourses of the Arab Spring

​Fall 2012

Daniel Lefkowitz
MW 10-10:50

The phenomenon of the "Arab Spring" is examined from the perspective of language, culture, and discourse. The course explores general questions of language, politics, social movements, and nationalisms, alongside specific issues of language-use in the (Arab) Middle East. Topics include: multilingualism and diglossia; language and the media; language in revolutionary states; and sociolinguistic changes in the Arab World.
 

ANTH 5420 Theories of Language

​Fall 2012

Ellen Contini-Morava
TR 12:30-1:45

We will survey a number of modern schools of linguistics, both American and European, trying to understand each approach in terms of its historical context, the goals it sets itself, the assumptions it makes about the nature of language, and the relation between theory and methodology. Grades will depend on: four or five written homework assignments that ask you to look at some data from a particular theoretical perspective; a take-home, open-book final exam; and evidence (from class discussion) that you have been doing the readings, which are an essential part of the course. Fulfills the Theory requirement for the Linguistics BA and MA.

 

ANTH 5490 Speech Play and Verbal Art

​Fall 2012

Daniel Lefkowitz
MW 2-3:15

This graduate-level seminar seeks to understand variation in language (and its significance for social relations and social hierarchies) by focusing on forms of language that are aesthetically valued (whether as powerful or as poetic) in particular communities. The course assumes some familiarity both with technical analysis of language and anthropological perspectives on social formations.

 

ANTH 7541 Topics in Sociolinguistics: Research Frontiers in Linguistic Anthropology

​Fall 2012

Eve Danziger
W 7-9:30

This graduate seminar course exposes students to a variety of recent and forthcoming research in linguistic anthropology, with an emphasis on students’ own professionalization and preparedness to undertake research.  Students will explore such topics as the preparation of a research proposal, ethics in linguistic anthropology research, and publication venues in this field.  Assignments will be tailored to the needs of particular students enrolled in the class, but will include written submissions as well as seminar presentations during the semester.

 

EDHS 8090 Language Disorders

​Fall 2012

Filip Loncke
T 10-12:45

Coverage includes language differences, language delays, language deviancies, and specific language impairment with topics ranging from language sampling to linguistic analysis, to intervention and counseling.  Topical coverage also include linguistic diversity, bilingualism, early intervention, literacy acquisition, dyslexia and hyperlexia.  Prerequisite: Language development course or instructor permission. 

 

EDIS 5480 Second Language Acquisition and Modern Language Teaching Methods: preK-12

​Fall 2012

Ruth Ferree
M 4-6:45

Considers theory and research in second language acquisition; classroom instructional procedures that follow the National Standards, which incorporate interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational modes and foster successful communication in foreign languages; and selection of appropriate materials, realia, visuals, and media for instructional purposes.  Prerequisite: Instructor permission. 

 

FREN 3030 Phonetics: The Sounds of French

​Fall 2012

Gladys Saunders
MWF 11-11:50
MWF 12-12:50

FREN 3030 is an introductory course in French phonetics, intended to present basic concepts in phonetic theory and teach students techniques for improving their own pronunciation.It includes an examination of the physical characteristics of individual French sounds; the relationship between these sounds and their written representation (spelling); the rules governing the pronunciation of "standard French"; the most salient phonological features of selected French varieties; phonetic differences between French and English sounds; and much more.Practical exercises in 'ear-training' and 'phonetic transcription' (using IPA) are also essential elements in this dynamic course.
Taught in French.

 

LATI 5559 Topics in Latin Linguistics

​Fall 2012

Coulter George
MW 3:30-4:45

This course will examine some of the major issues in Latin linguistics, including, but not limited to, the Indo-European background of Latin, the relationship of Latin to the other early Italic dialects (especially Oscan and Umbrian), the pragmatics of Latin particles and word order, bilingualism in the Roman Empire, and the development of Vulgar Latin. This course satisfies the structure of a language requirement for the major and M.A. program. Prerequisite: Latin 2020 or equivalent.

 

LING 3400/7400 Structure of English

​Fall 2012

Janay Crabtree
MWF 9-9:50

This course provides students with a foundation in the grammar of the English language. Topics include the phonology, morphology, syntax, with a focus on structural analysis. Students will gain confidence in discussing the form, function, and usage of linguistic structures. These topics will also be related to the teaching and tutoring of English as a second language including error correction and feedback. Fulfills the Structure requirement for the Linguistics BA and MA. 

 

LNGS 3250/7010 Introduction to Linguistic Theory and Methodology

​Fall 2012

Mark Elson
MWF 11-11:50 + optional discussion

This course provides an introduction to language as a semiotic system and to the theoretical assumptions and methodology of linguistic analysis. Data from a variety of languages are considered. 

 

PHIL 7450 Philosophy of Language

​Fall 2012

Mitchell Green
R 1-3:30

Philosophical problems can often be either solved or dissolved by scrutiny of the language in which they are couched.  What is more, language and linguistic interaction themselves raise questions of the deepest conceptual kind, answers to which illuminate cognition and social interaction.  This course will examine, with the aid of technical tools from logic, topics that have been given the most intense treatment in the field, and which flow from the questions,  In virtue of what is language meaningful, and how shall we characterize that meaning?  Topics to be covered include the relation between truth and meaning; the pragmatic determination of content; the method of solving or dissolving traditional philosophical problems by scrutiny of the language in which they are couched; the relation of semantics to pragmatics; questions about the definition of language; phenomena on the "penumbra" of meaning such as metaphor, expressive language, and presupposition. Prerequisite: an undergraduate-level course in symbolic logic.

 

PSYC 5310 Developmental Psycholinguistics

​Fall 2012

John Bonvillian
TR 9:30-10:45

Examination of current research findings and models of children’s language acquisition. In addition to studying typically developing children’s acquisition of spoken language skills, we will examine sign language acquisition in children with deaf parents. Special attention also will be given to the development of communication skills in children with autism and with intellectual disabilities.

 

SPAN 3000 Spanish Phonetics

​Fall 2012

Joel Rini
TR 2-3:15

Omar Velazquez Mendoza
MWF 1-1:50

Spanish Phonetics provides an introduction to the sound system of both Peninsular and Latin American Spanish. Class discussions focus on how the sounds of Spanish are produced from an articulatory point of view, and how these sounds are organized and represented in the linguistic competence of their speakers. When appropriate, comparisons will be made between Spanish and English or Spanish and other (Romance) languages. This course seeks to improve the students’ pronunciation. Course conducted in Spanish.                       

 

SPAN 4559 Theories of Writing

​Fall 2012

Omar Velazquez Mendoza
MWF 2-2:50

Following systemic functional linguistics, this course examines the advanced capacities of first, second, and heritage language learners. Its main goal is to describe how these capacities are realized linguistically in written (academic) language—among other means—through lexical density, grammatical metaphor, clause-combining strategies, and impersonality. This topic will prove extremely helpful both for students who are especially interested in attaining a better mastery of their formal registers and for those who are interested in the teaching profession. Course conducted in Spanish.

 

SPAN 7220 History of the Language

​Fall 2012

Joel Rini
TR 12:30-1:45

The development of the Spanish language from its origins. Taught in Spanish.  Fulfills historical linguistics requirement for the M.A. program.

 

 

Spring 2013

AMST 2500 Language and New Media

Spring 2013

Ashley Williams
MW 3:30-4:45

In this course we investigate the interactional relationship between language and American society with a focus on New Media contexts. More specifically, we consider how language both shapes and is shaped by society in email, texting, Facebook, blogging, online gaming, YouTube, and more. Taking an interdisciplinary approach that draws from fields such an anthropology, linguistics, media & communication studies, psychology, and sociology, we turn our analytical and critical gaze to how social constructions (including race, gender, class, ideology, power, and youth) variably influence, are created by, and are realized in New Media genres. Fulfills the Second Writing requirement for the College.

 

ANTH 2400 Language and Culture

​Spring 2013

Liliana Perkowski 
MW 12-12:50 plus obligatory discussion section

A survey of topics having to do with the relationship between language, culture, and society. We will consider both how language is described and analyzed by linguists and how linguistic data can shed light on a variety of social, cultural, and cognitive phenomena. The range of topics may include: nature of language, origins of language, how languages change, use of linguistic evidence to make inferences about prehistory, the effects of linguistic categories on thought and behavior, regional and social variation in language, language acquisition, and cultural rules for communication. Satisfies the non-Western perspectives requirement for the College.

 

ANTH 2430 Languages of the World

​Spring 2013

Lise Dobrin 
MW 11-11:50 plus obligatory discussion section

This course introduces students to the diversity of human language and the principles of linguistic classification. How many languages are spoken in the world, and how are they related? What features do all languages share, and in what ways may they differ? In surveying the world's languages, we will focus on the structure and social situation of a set of representative languages for each geographic region covered. We will also discuss the global trend of shift from the use of minority languages to large languages of wider communication, and what this means for the future of human diversity. Course work includes problem sets, essays, and a final paper on the linguistic features and social situation of a minor language. Prerequisites: one year of a foreign language or permission of instructor.

 

ANTH 3490 Language and Thought

​Spring 2013

Eve Danziger 
WF 9-9:50

There is almost always more than one way to think about any problem. But could speaking a particular language make some strategies and solutions seem more natural than others to individuals? Can we learn about alternative ways of approaching the external world by studying other languages? The classic proposal of linguistic relativity as enunciated by Benjamin Lee Whorf is examined in the light of recent cross-cultural psycholinguistic research. We highlight the interplay between social intelligence, linguistic structure and general cognition. In the course of this discussion we approach the question of how language-specific cognitive preferences could develop in the course of children’s language acquisition. Finally, we ask how culturally-particular ways of talking about language itself might reflect and reinforce the "common-sense" ideas about the nature of language that underlie most linguistic research. Fulfills the Theory requirement for Linguistics.

 

ANTH 5410 Phonology

​Spring 2013

Lise Dobrin 
TR 12:30-1:45

Phonology is concerned with the way speech sounds are organized as systems. Which sounds occur in a given language? What are the rules for their combination? How are they realized in different positions of a word or phrase? In order to answer these kinds of questions, we look not only at the patterning of segments, but also at the way that patterning is explained in terms of more basic properties, features. We look at higher level prosodic structures like syllables that group sounds into larger units. We also study aspects of the speech signal that are in principle independent of the segment, like stress, tone, and rhythm. In this course students gain experience analyzing phonological systems in a theoretically informed way. They learn to appreciate what kinds of problems the field of phonology aims to account for, to argue for solutions to such problems, and to understand the significance of their analyses in terms of the broader concerns of phonological theory. Coursework involves reading, class discussion, and solving homework problems. Fulfills the Theory requirement for Linguistics. Prerequisite: LNGS 3250 or permission of instructor.

 

ANTH 7400 Linguistic Anthropology

​Spring 2013

Daniel Lefkowitz
T 2-4:30

This is an advanced introduction to linguistic anthropology, a sub-field of anthropology that looks at language as a socio-cultural phenomenon and at society and culture as discursive phenomena. Linguistic anthropologists are interested both in how the study of language can help address issues of social structure and cultural change, and in how the study of social context can inform the description of linguistic systems. This course mirrors the field’s duality in that the readings, lectures, and practical exercises combine linguistic description and analysis with ethnographic interpretation. One goal of the course is to provide anthropology students with the ability to interpret language use as a social practice wherever they conduct research. The course fulfills the Linguistics requirement for students in the Anthropology graduate program. It also fulfills the Theory requirement for Linguistics.

 

ANTH 7541 Topics in Sociolinguistics: Voice and Stance 

​Spring 2013

Eve Danziger
W 2-4:30

The course takes up the question of the multiple “voices” or personae that can be present in a single speech act, from such extreme examples as those of spirit possession or scripted stage performance, to the more everyday phenomena of unconscious intertextual echoing,or conversational allusion to “viral” soundbites. We examine the literature relevant to this phenomenon, and consider the ways in which this literature helps us to deal with the idea of speaker commitment to, or moral accountability for, what is said (“stance”).

 

EDHS 5020 Speech and Hearing Sciences

​Spring 2013

Filip Loncke
TR 11-12:15 

The course examines principal concepts and procedures for the study of physiologic, perceptual and acoustic aspects of voice, speech and hearing.

 

*EDIS 8500 Writing: Research, Teaching, and Learning

​Spring 2013

Amanda Kibler
TR 9-10:45 AM

This course is designed for doctoral and masters students interested in the teaching and research of writing and how students learn to write, with a specific K-12 focus. We will explore key issues in the field of writing, particularly for diverse populations, as well as theories underlying research. The practice of teaching writing is integrated into all issues and topics, and accordingly we will also address some pedagogical theory.

 

ENLS 3030 History of the English Language

​Spring 2013

Peter Baker
TR 9-10:45 AM

This course will introduce you to the history of the English language from several perspectives: we will be concerned with the language's "internal history" (what actually happened to its sounds, grammar and vocabulary). But we will also study how and why languages change and, more specifically, the "external history" of English (the cultural and historical contexts that have produced change). The course begins with the Indo-European and Germanic background of English, and we will spend some time with the language as it developed in the British Isles. In the second half of the term we will study the development of American English: its divergence from British English, the development of regional, racial and ethnic varieties, and the emergence in the twentieth century of a national "standard." At all times we will bear in mind that language is an aspect of social interaction, and when we study language change we are also studying social change.

 

LNGS 5000 Linguistic Principles for Teachers of Foreign Languages

​Spring 2013

Mark Elson
TR 2-3:15

This course aims to provide a basic understanding of linguistic systems, their structure, diversity and complexity, proceeding from the assumption that such knowledge is the underpinning of good language pedagogy (i.e., that good language pedagogy proceeds from knowledge of the nature of linguistic systems, making it possible for instructors to anticipate difficulties and thus plan the impartation of L2 structure in an informed manner). It also aims to develop the student's ability to think critically about the goals and obligations of second language instruction at the college/university (as opposed to high school) level. This is a required course for students in the university's TESOL Certificate program. Prospective enrollees should note that this is not a course in methodology. Instructor permission required.

 

PETR 3340 Poetics of Existentialist Persian Literature

​Spring 2013

Alireza Korangy Isfahani
MW 4-5:15

The main objective of this course is the study of cognitive nuances which make up the thematic and linguistic parameters of text—and its analysis in Persian literature and some of the other literatures in the region—that deal with existentialist issues. It will focus, mainly, on Classical Persian literature as it has, for 800 years, served as the symbol of thematic ingenuity and linguistic enigma in terms of poetics; and embodies, rhetorically, nuanced intricacies, deeply immersed in the use of language (i.e. rhetoric, figurative language, etc.). Henceforth, syntax becomes a jigsaw puzzle, comprehension of whose linguistic and hence poetic parameters delivers the intent of the writer in purveying his or her existential issues. True to form, theme, rhetoric, morphology, and syntax—as in most cultural settings—have worked together to convey the importance of content. The social and linguistic pragmatics can be misconstrued as the superficial dimensions of interpretation can actually be—and often are— diametrically opposed to the veiled meaning—intended by the poet—which is heavily immersed in linguistic and thematic historical precedents. Last, but not least, the phonological—and hence musical—aspects of this study will focus on the analysis of musical and phonological structures, which actually effectuate and amplify the signification of existentialist genres of expression. The quantitative and very mathematical nature of Persian meter and prosody will be analyzed. Every class will have a parallel analysis of descriptive grammar in the covered text—in translation. As this is a class in the study in poetics, linguistics of Persian literature and its centuries old dealings with existentialism, necessarily, influences, both in terms of historical precedence (Arabic, etc.) on Persian and in terms of subsequent linguistic and poetical influences on other literatures in Iran, such as Kurdish, Lori, Gilaki will be surveyed and analyzed as well, although to a lesser degree.

 

PHIL 5520 Pragmatics

​Spring 2013

Mitchell Green
R 1-3:30

Pragmatics is the study of the use of language to convey more than what we literally say, as well as the study of how communication is possible in the absence of conventional language. Not limited to communication in our own species, pragmatics also seeks insights from the study of gesture, alarm calls, and even chemical communication in other species both extant and extinct. Among our topics will be speech acts, implicature, presupposition, non-literal language, expressive behavior (including the use of epithets and other “charged” language), and insights from the recently resurgent study of the evolution of communication. Students will write two papers, make one class presentation, take a final examination, and participate actively in discussion throughout the term. Fulfills the Theory requirement for Linguistics.

 

PSYC 4110 Psycholinguistics

​Spring 2013

Filip Loncke 
M 3-6

This course focuses on the psychological processes that underlie the acquisition and the use of language. There is an emphasis on the interaction between linguistic skills and other cognitive skills. The course also looks at flexibility of language and language use, and the influence of psycholinguistic processes on reading and writing, the social use of language, and language in other modalities.

 

PSYC 4111 Language Development and Disorders

​Spring 2013

John Bonvillian
TR 11-12:15

This course examines the development of language and communication skills from a variety of perspectives. In addition to studying the acquisition of spoken language in typically developing children, we will review the acquisition of spoken and signed languages in deaf children, children with autism, children with specific language impairment, and children with intellectual disabilities. We will also examine the acquisition of language-like communication skills in nonhuman primates. This course is not open to students who have taken PSYC 5310.

 

RUSS 5010 Advanced Russian Grammar: Syntax

​Spring 2013

Mark Elson 
TR 8:30-9:45

This course is a formal and systematic analysis of the basic syntactic structures of the contemporary Russian literary language with frequent comparison to English (and other, when possible) structures. The emphasis will be on data, not theoretical principles although the conventional theoretical machinery and language of syntax (phrase structure, complement, anaphora) will be used at all times in class and on assignments. There will be several graded written assignments in the form of analyses. Prerequisite: Some background in Russian (at least through RUSS 1020 for non-native speakers). Instructor permission required.

 

SPAN 4202 Hispanic Sociolinguistics

​Spring 2013

Omar Velázquez-Mendoza
MWF 3-3:50

This course examines the Spanish language within its social context by exploring the following topics: language versus dialect; the standard language; linguistic variation and its main variables: geography, gender, age, etc.; language variation and language change; language contact and biligualism; Spanish in the US; code switching. Course conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 3200 or 3000.

 

SPAN 4203 Structure of Spanish

​Spring 2013

Joel Rini 
MW 3-4:15

Seminar in Spanish linguistics. Taught in Spanish. Class fulfills Structure of a Language requirement for Linguistics. Students interested in taking the course for graduate credit should contact the instructor.

 

SPAN 4210 History of the Spanish Language II 

​Spring 2013

Omar Velázquez-Mendoza
MWF 4-4:50

This course traces the historical development of the Spanish language from its origins as a spoken Latin variety to the present. Class discussions and presentations will be based on textual scrutiny of authentic documents coming from all periods of Spanish, with particular attention given to the writings composed during the Middle Ages. Course conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 3200 or 3000.