2014-2015 Linguistics Courses

Spring 2015

AMST 2500-001       Language in the U.S.

TR 12:30-1:45

Ashley Williams

Contrary to popular belief, the U.S. is not (and never has been) linguistically homogenous: from dying and revitalized Native American languages to newly arrived immigrant languages, from regional and social dialect variation to innovation among adolescents and Hip Hop, the American language situation is diverse and changing. This course invites students to investigate this not-quite-melting-pot variety both through readings in current research and through small-scale field research. Topics covered in the course will include the origins and distinctions of American English, language controversies such as Ebonics and the English-Only movement, research in language attitudes and discrimination, topics in bilingualism and education, plus the latest studies in language issues involving different ethnicities, genders, sexualities, ages, and social classes. In this course we will pull material from a variety of sources (including films, literature, the media, and recent studies), and will employ a variety of approaches (linguistic, anthropological, sociological, historical, and more) as we investigate and debate what is uniquely “American” about the language situation in the United States. Fulfills the Second Writing Requirement.

 

ANTH 2420    Language and Gender

MW 10-10:50 + obligatory discussion section

Ellen Contini-Morava

In many societies, features of pronunciation, vocabulary choice, and/or communicative style are used as social markers of gender identity and differentiation. We will take a cross-cultural perspective, comparing language use within the U.S. and in other parts of the world, especially non-Western societies.  Questions to be addressed include: How does language use reflect or construct a person’s sex, gender, or sexual orientation? How do language differences, where they exist, contribute to the social construction of gender identity and difference in our and other cultures? How do these differences, or the belief in differences,  affect people’s lives/social identities? What social factors besides gender relate to language differentiation, and how do they interact with gender? Is language itself sexist? If so, what can or should be done about it? Course requirements: a group project recording and analyzing a segment of natural conversation; an individual paper; reading checks; participation in discussion; a take-home final exam.

 

ANTH 3490    Language and Thought

WF 11-12 + obligatory discussion section

Eve Danziger

There is almost always more than one way to think about any problem. But could speaking a particular language make some strategies and solutions seem more natural than others to individuals? Can we learn about alternative ways of approaching the external world by studying other languages? The classic proposal of linguistic relativity as enunciated by Benjamin Lee Whorf is examined in the light of recent cross-cultural psycholinguistic research. This class fulfills the Linguistics requirement for Anthropology and for Cognitive Science majors. It fulfills the Theory requirement for Linguistics majors.

 

ANTH 3450/ ANTH 7450    Native American Languages

MW 3:30-4:15

Eve Danziger

This course is an introduction to the native languages of the Americas. It serves as a way into knowledge of languages very different from English and the frequently studied European languages. The course covers the major grammatical structures found in the different language families of the Americas, and considers the sociolinguistic situation of Native American speakers in the U.S. and elsewhere. Students will become familiar with the structure of Mopan Maya, an indigenous language of Eastern Central America which is related to the Classic Mayan languages of antiquity, and belongs to a large family of modern Mayan languages spoken today by thousands of people in Belize, Mexico, and Guatemala. The methods of analysis should enable students to make intelligent use of linguistic materials on languages  found in other parts of the world as well. ANTH 3450: Pre-requisite: LGS 3250 or prior intensive language study. This course fulfills the Language Structure requirement for Linguistics majors. ANTH 7450: Pre-requisite: LGS 7010 or ANTH 7400. This course fulfills the Language Structure requirement for Linguistics graduate students.

 

ANTH 5401    Linguistic Field Methods

MW 4-6:30

Lise Dobrin

In this course we work as a group to induce the phonological and grammatical structure of an unfamiliar language based on data collected from a native speaker consultant in class. Students will write their own linguistic descriptions, engage in structured reflection on the nature of linguistic fieldwork, and take a leadership role in collecting and organizing the data. Satisfies the Structure requirement for Linguistics. SPECIAL NOTE: This spring the course will run on a compressed schedule, meeting twice weekly for seven weeks from February to early April. Instructor permission is required to enroll.

 

ANTH 5410    Phonology

T 5-7:30

Lise Dobrin

Phonology is concerned with the way speech sounds are organized as systems. Which sounds occur in a given language? What are the rules for their combination? How are they realized in different positions of a word or phrase? In order to answer these kinds of questions, we look not only at the patterning of segments, but also at the way that patterning is explained in terms of more basic properties, features. We look at higher level prosodic structures like syllables that group sounds into larger units. We also study aspects of the speech signal that are in principle independent of the segment, like stress, tone, and rhythm. In this course students gain experience analyzing phonological systems in a theoretically informed way. They learn to appreciate what kinds of problems the field of phonology aims to account for, to argue for solutions to such problems, and to understand the significance of their analyses in terms of the broader concerns of phonological theory. Coursework involves reading, class discussion, and solving homework problems. Fulfills the Theory requirement for Linguistics. Prerequisite: LNGS 3250 or permission of instructor.

 

ANTH 5541    Topics in Linguistics: Nouns and Their Trappings

TR 12:30-1:45

Ellen Contini-Morava

Nouns as a grammatical category are often described as a linguistic universal, but what does it mean to claim this?  Of course it is possible to name things and to describe who is doing what in any language, but is that the same thing as having “noun” as a grammatical category? This seminar will explore the criteria for answering this question, and for languages that appear to have the category “noun”, we will also look at other categories often associated with nouns, like number, gender/noun class, case, determiners, and relative clauses, and at the grammatical phenomenon of nominalization.  Each student will choose a particular language to focus on for the course, reporting on that language for a series of assignments. Prerequisite: a course in linguistics. This course will count toward the Theory requirement for the linguistics major and MA program.

 

ANTH 7541    Topics in Sociolinguistics: Discourse Analysis

R 2-4:30

Dan Lefkowitz

This course takes an in-depth and applied approach to the analysis of discourse. We will read exemplary studies of discourse and focus on the application of theories of discourse to the development of students' own research projects. Specific topics to be covered include: symbolic interactionism, conversation analysis, critical discourse analysis, interactional sociolinguistics, discourse prosody, and digital audio and video analysis.

 

EDHS 5020    Introduction to Speech and Hearing Science

TR 11-12:15

Filip Loncke

The course examines principal concepts and procedures for the study of physiologic, perceptual and acoustic aspects of voice, speech and hearing.  The course leads the student into the fascinating world of new applications in daily life, in business, and especially in education and clinical work.

 

FREN 3030    The Sounds of French

TR 2-3:15

Gladys Saunders

FREN 3030 is an introductory course in French phonetics, intended to present basic concepts in articulatory phonetics and phonology, and teach students techniques for improving their own pronunciation. It includes an examination of the physical characteristics of individual French sounds; the relationship between these sounds and their written representation (spelling); the rules governing the pronunciation of "standard French"; phonetic differences between French and English sounds; the most salient phonological features of selected French varieties; and much more. Practical exercises in 'ear-training' and 'phonetic transcription' (using IPA) are also essential elements in this dynamic course. Taught in French. 

 

FREN 4020    History of the French Language in its Social and Cultural Context

TR 11-12:15

Gladys Saunders

The course aims at giving an introduction to the external history of the French language, that is to say, the social, political, geographical, cultural and historical factors that have provoked the evolution of the French language through time.  We will begin by reviewing the geographical distribution of French in the world today and by asking the question: how did this situation come about?  Then we will turn our attention to other topics of importance, for example:  the growth of French into the national standard variety; language regulatory bodies; the rise of French as an international language; the French Revolution and linguistic revolution; dialects, regional languages and the national language; the linguistic effects of the mass circulation of popular writings, of public schooling, of the military on the French language; industrialization and the propagation of French; the origins of French creoles; immigrant languages and language change; English and French in contact and in conflict (1000 years of annoyances!);  negative attitudes and pronouncements about the decline of  French in the 20th century (la langue française est-elle un atout ou un obstacle?). Taught in French, the course will also provide students interested in practicing their French language skills a forum for lively discussions and debates (on stimulating topics relevant to the dynamics of the French language). 

 

GETR 3590    German and English Linguistics (Part II) 

MW 2-3:15

Sybil Scholz

This course aims at providing profound insights into the distinct workings of the German and English languages. After having covered the major subdisciplines of formal linguistics (phonology, morphology, and syntax) in Part I of the course, Part II will focus on meaning and language use and explore topics from semantics, pragmatics, and sociolinguistics, including conversational implicatures, speech acts, discourse structure, and gendered discourse. The field of pragmatics deals with language from the point of view of its users, the choices they make, the constraints they encounter in using language in social interaction, and the effects their use of language has on the other participants in an act of communication. Linguistic interaction, however personal or insignificant it may seem, bears the traces of the social structure that it both expresses and helps to reproduce. We will apply some of these concepts directly to German and English language samples and analyze these concepts contrastively where appropriate. Students will have the opportunity to discover the workings of these two languages with hands-on practice. This course is useful for students with linguistic grounding but also for novices and will be taught in English. Part I of the course is not a prerequisite. No prior knowledge of German is needed.

 

GREE 5559    Topics in Greek Linguistics

MW 2-3:15

Coulter George

This course will examine some of the major issues in Greek linguistics, including, but not limited to, the Indo-European background of Greek, Mycenaean Greek (Linear B), the Greek dialects and the language of Homer, the pragmatics of Greek particles, word order, and tense usage, and the development of Koine Greek. Prerequisites: Three years of Greek and one year of Latin

 

LING 5090     TESOL Theory and Practices

TR 12:30-1:45

Janay Crabtree

This course provides an introduction to theories of second language acquisition (SLA), as well as methods and materials for Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL), particularly adult language learners. Students will be required to investigate current issues in the field of TESOL and SLA, and to apply their learning to language learning observations and volunteering tutoring experiences. Recommended pre-/co-requisite: LNGS 3250 & LING 3400. These courses are not required, but I think they should be recommended for students to have requisite background knowledge. Counts three credits toward the TESOL Certificate.

 

LING 5101     ESL Teaching Practicum: Language

R 11-12:15

Elizabeth Wittner and Janay Crabtree

Through this 1-credit course, students focus on the topic of language in an L2, while gaining experience in the practice of English-language teaching to international students, faculty, and staff at the University. This experience is an excellent opportunity to gain teaching experience under the supervision of an experienced mentor. For every 1 hour of credit, students must meet with an instructor for 5 classroom & practice 33 hours.

 

LING 5102     ESL Teaching Practicum: Culture

R 11-12:15

Elizabeth Wittner and Janay Crabtree

Through this 1-credit course, students focus on the topic of culture in ESL, while gaining experience in the practice of English-language teaching to international students, faculty, and staff at the University. This experience is an excellent opportunity to gain teaching experience under the supervision of an experienced mentor. For every 1 hour of credit, students must meet with an instructor for 5 classroom & practice 33 hours.

 

LING 5103     ESL Teaching Practicum: Writing

F 9-10:30 on 1/23, 2/13/, 3/6, 4/3, and 4/17 in Dell 2, Room 101

Janay Crabtree and Jane Boatner

Through this 1-credit course, students focus on the topic of writing in an L2, while gaining experience in the practice of English-language teaching to international students, faculty, and staff at the University. This experience is an excellent opportunity to gain teaching experience under the supervision of an experienced mentor. For every 1 hour of credit, students must meet with an instructor for 5 classroom & practice 33 hours.

 

LNGS 5000     Linguistic Principles for Teachers of Foreign Languages

MW 8:30-9:50

Mark Elson

This course has three objectives: 1. To discuss the concept of communicative competence, and to evaluate its involvement in current language instruction; 2. Proceeding from there, to think critically about the goals and obligations of second language instruction at the college/university (as opposed to high school) level, and 3. To provide a basic understanding of linguistic systems, their structure, diversity (through an encounter with Hungarian), and complexity, proceeding from the assumption that such knowledge is the underpinning of good language pedagogy (i.e., that good language pedagogy proceeds from knowledge of the nature of linguistic systems, making it possible for instructors to anticipate difficulties and thus plan the impartation of L2 structure in an informed manner). Students doing TESOL are welcome. Open to both graduates and advanced undergraduates. Prospective enrollees should note that this is not a course in methodology. Prerequisite: permission of instructor, and a demonstrable interest in language instruction

 

PSYC 4110  Psycholinguistics

W 9-11:30

Filip Loncke

This course focuses on the psychological processes that underlie the acquisition and the use of language. There is an emphasis on the interaction between linguistic skills and other cognitive skills. The course also looks at flexibility of language and language use, and the influence of psycholinguistic processes on reading and writing, the social use of language, and language in other modalities. There will be a focus on learnability and teachability issues. Content: the course will provide insight in 1) acquisition and learnability, 2) the biopsychology of language (neuro-linguistics, linguistic genetics), 3) the micro-genesis of speech (the Levelt model), 4) perceptual processes, 5) expressive mechanisms, 6) multimodality, 7) bilingualism and variation, 8) interaction between language and cognition, 9) a psycholinguistic approach to breakdown (i.e., pathology). Note: This course is a 4000-level PSYC-seminar with an enrollment of 20 students. Priority will be given to students who major or have a double major in Psychology.

 

PSYC 4120     Psychology of Reading

W 3:30-6

Beverly Adams

Analyzes the critical psychological experiments which have influenced the way that psychologists consider topics in reading, such as text comprehension, parsing, and sentence processing. Prerequisite: PSYC 1010 or 2150 or instructor permission. Enrollment is limited to advanced undergraduates in Psychology, Linguistics, Cognitive Science, or Speech and Hearing Science. Students may not simultaneously enroll in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course.

 

PSYC 5310     Developmental Psycholinguistics

TR 11-12:15

John Bonvillian

Examination of current research findings and models of children’s language acquisition. In addition to studying typically developing children’s acquisition of spoken language skills, we will examine sign language acquisition in children with deaf parents. Special attention also will be given to the development of communication skills in children with autism and with intellectual disabilities.

 

SLAV 8500     Old Church Slavonic

MW 2-3:15

Mark Elson

This course introduces students to the earliest attested Slavic language (tenth/eleventh century), a generalized form of East Balkan Slavic which is commonly referred to as Old Church Slavonic. This language has survived (in somewhat modified form) as the liturgical/literary language of Orthodox (as opposed to Catholic and other) Slavs. The course will treat the structure of the language, its status as an ancient Indo-European language, and will include the reading and analysis of texts. Prerequisites: one year of Russian and the permission of the instructor.

 

SPAN 3000    Phonetics

MWF 11-11:50

Omar Velázquez-Mendoza

Spanish Phonetics provides an introduction to the sound system of both Peninsular and Latin American Spanish. Class discussions focus on how the sounds of Spanish are produced from an articulatory point of view, and how these sounds are organized and represented in the linguistic competence of their speakers. When appropriate, comparisons will be made between Spanish and English or Spanish and other (Romance and non-Romance) languages. This course seeks to improve the students’ pronunciation. Taught in Spanish. Pre-requisite: SPAN 2020 or equivalent.

 

SPAN 4202    Sociolinguistics

MWF 10-10:50

Omar Velázquez-Mendoza

This course examines the Spanish language within its social context by exploring the following topics: language versus dialect; the standard language; linguistic variation and its main variables: geography, gender, age, etc.; language variation and language change; language contact and biligualism; Spanish in the US; code switching. Course conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 3200 or 3000.

 

SPAN 4203    Structure of Spanish

TR 2-3:15

Joel Rini

This course is designed to give the student a profound understanding of the fundamental structures of Modern Spanish through both synchronic and diachronic analyses.  Various topics will include, but will not be limited to, syllable structure, word structure, pronominal phenomena, and synchronically irregular verbal structures and their origins.

 
 

Fall 2014

ANTH 2400 Language and Culture

Fall 2014

MWF 12-12:50

Grace Reynolds

A survey of topics having to do with the relationship between language, culture, and society. We will consider both how language is described and analyzed by linguists and how evidence from language can shed light on a variety of social, cultural, and cognitive phenomena. Topics include: nature of language, origins of language, how languages change, writing systems, use of linguistic evidence to make inferences about prehistory, the effects of linguistic categories on thought and behavior, regional and social variation in language, and cultural rules for communication. Satisfies the College Non-Western perspectives requirement.

 

ANTH 2440 Language and Cinema

Fall 2014

MW 9-9:50, plus obligatory discussion section

Daniel Lefkowitz

Looks historically at speech and language in Hollywood movies, including the technological challenges and artistic theories and controversies attending the transition from silent to sound films. Focuses on the ways that gender, racial, ethnic, and national identities are constructed through the representation of speech, dialect, and accent. Introduces semiotics but requires no knowledge of linguistics or film studies. 

 

ANTH 2470/ MEST 2470 Reflections of Exile: Jewish Languages and their Communities

Fall 2014

TR 12:30-1:45

Daniel Lefkowitz

Considers Jewish languages Yiddish, Judeo-Arabic, Ladinoa, and Hebrew from historical, linguistic, and literary perspectices. Explores the relations between communities and languages, the nature of diaspora, and the death and revival of languages. No prior knowledge of these languages is required.

 

ANTH 3480/7480 Language and Prehistory

Fall 2014

WF 10-10:50, plus obligatory discussion section

Eve Danziger

This course covers the basic principles of diachronic linguistics - the study of how languages change over time - and discusses the uses of linguistic data in the reconstruction of prehistory. We will consider the use of linguistic evidence in tracing prehistoric population movements, in demonstrating contact among prehistoric groups, and in the reconstruction of daily life. To the extent that the literature permits, examples and case studies will be drawn from the Mayan language area of Central America, and will include discussion of the pre-Columbian Mayan writing system and its ongoing decipherment. This course fulfills the linguistics distribution requirement for Anthropology majors and for Cognitive Science majors. It also fulfills the Historical requirement for the Linguistics BA and MA.

 

ANTH 3541/7541 Topics in Linguistics: African Languages/ Topics in Sociolinguistics: African Languages

Fall 2014

MW 2:00-3:15

Ellen Contini-Morava

This course is an introduction to the linguistic diversity of the African continent, with a focus on sub-Saharan Africa. For about three-fourths of the course we will discuss linguistic structures (sound systems, word-formation, and syntax) among a wide variety of languages; the classification of African languages; and the use of linguistic data to reconstrct prehistory. For the last fourth of the course we will address a range of sociolinguistic topics, including language and social identity, social functions of language, verbal art, the politics of language planning, and the rise of "mixed" languages among urban youth. While lectures address general and comparative topics, each student will choose one language to focus on, using published materials available in the library. This language will be the basis for he major assignments. Some prior experience with linguistics is desirable (such as LNGS 3250/7010, ANTH 2400, or ANTH 7400), but the course will also be accessible to highly motivated students who have not taken a previous linguistics course. For these students, supplementary readings on basic linguistics will be included in the syllabus. This course fulfills the Language Structure requirement for Linguistics majors and graduate students.

 

ANTH 5420 Theories of Language

Fall 2014

TR 2:00-3:15

Ellen Contini-Morava

We will survey a number of modern schools of linguistics, both American and European, trying to understand each approach in terms of its historical context, the goals it sets itself, the assumptions it makes about the nature of language, and the relation between theory and methodology. Grades will depend on: four or five written homework assignments that ask you to look at some data from a particular theoretical perspective; a take-home, open-book final exam; and evidence (from class discussion) that you have been doing the readings, which are an essential part of the course. Fulfills the Theory requirement for Linguistics.

 

ANTH 5480 Literacy and Orality

Fall 2014

M 5:00-7:30

Lise Dobrin

This course surveys ethnographic and linguistic literature on literacy, focusing on the social meanins of speaking vs. writing (and hearing vs. reading) as opposed communicative practices, looking especially at traditionally oral societies.

 

ANTH 7400 Linguistic Anthropology

T 4-6:30

Lise Dobrin

This is an advanced introduction to linguistic anthropology, a sub-field of anthropology that looks at language as a socio-cultural phenomenon and at society and culture as discursive phenomena. Linguistic anthrpologists are interested both in how the study of language can help address issues of social structure and cultural change, and in how the study of social context can inform the description of linguistic systems. This course mirrors the field's duality in that the readings, lectures, and practical exercises combine linguistic description and analysis with ethnographic interpretation. One goal of the course is to provide anthropology students with the ability to interpret language use as a social practice wherever they conduct research. The course fulfills the Linguistics requirement for graduate students in Anthropology. It also fulfills the Theory requirement for Linguistics.

 

ASL 4750 Topics in Deaf Studies

Fall 2014

MW 5:00-6:15

Christopher Krentz

Examines such topics as American deaf history; ASL linguistics; deaf education; cultural versus pathological views of deaf people; controversies over efforts to eliminate sign language and cure deafness; ASL poetry and storytelling; deafness in mainstream literature, film, and drama; deafness and other minority identities; and the international deaf community.

 

CLAS 3350 Language and Literature of the Early Celts

Fall 2014

MWF 10-10:50

Coulter George

This introduction to the Celtic inhabitants of Gaul and Britain unites two approaches, one literacy, one linguistic. First, we will compare descriptions of the Celts found in Greek and Latin authors with readings of Celtic literature in translation, notably Ireland's great prose epic, the Táin Bó Cúalinge. Second, we will explore how the Celtic languages work, focusing on the basics of Old Irish as well as touching on Middle Welsh and Gaulish.

 

EDHS 4300 Psycholinguistics and Communication

Fall 2014

T 5:00-7:30

Filip Loncke

This course focuses on the psychological processes that underlie the acquisition and the use of language. There is an emphasis on the interaction between linguistic skills and other cognitive skills. Topics include learnability, microgenesis of speech, bilingualism and variation, and a psycholinguistic approach to breakdowns (i.e., language pathology).

 

EDIS 8500 Special Topics: Discourse Analysis in Education

Fall 2014

M 3:30-6:00

Amanda Kibler

This course provides an introduction to discourse analysis theory and methodology as they relate to classrooms and other educational settings. Readings will provide an overview of discourse analysis approaches used in educational research, with a particular focus on micro-ethnographic and conversation-analytic approaches. Fieldwork and hands-on analysis of discourse will form a significant portion of the course.

 

ENMD 5010 Introduction to Old English

Fall 2014

MWF 10-10:50

Peter Baker

This course will introduce you to English language and literature from before circa AD 1100-- the language of Beowulf, The Dream of the Rood, The Wanderer, and a number of other classics of medieval literature. We will begin with intensive study of the language (no prior knowledge of Old or Middle English is assumed) and the reading of simple texts. By the middle of the term we will have proceeded to more difficult prose texts and to poetry. Assignments will include (in addition to the readings) frequent exercises, bi-weekly quizzes, a final exam, and a short final paper. This course is a prerequisite for ENMD 5200, Beowulf, to be offered Spring 2015. 

 

FREN 3030 Phonetics

Fall 2014

TR 11:00-12:15/ TR 12:30-1:45

Gladys Saunders

FREN 3030 is an introductory course in French phonetics, intended to present basic concepts in phonetic theory and teach students techniques for improving their own pronunciation. It includes an examination of the physical characteristics of individual French sounds; the relationship between these sounds and their written representation (spelling); the rules governing the pronunciation of "standard French"; the most salient phonological features of selected French varieties; phonetic differences between French and English sounds; and much more. Practical exercises in 'ear-training' and 'phonetic transcription' (using IPA) are also essential elements in this dynamic course. Prerequisite: FREN 2020 (or equivalent). Taught in French.

 

GETR 3590 Course(s) in English: German and English Linguistics

Fall 2014

MW 2:00-3:15

Sybil Scholz

This course aims at providing profound insights into the distinct workings of the German and English languages as well as conveying a basic understanding of core descriptive tools and theoretical insights of Generative Grammar, the approach to linguistics that focuses on language as a mental phenomenon with a universal basis. It also aims at developing the reasoning skills necessary to apply these tools and insights to linguistic material from German and English. After looking at the major linguistic levels (phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics) and exploring the basic characteristics of sound structure, word structure, sentence structure, meaning, and first language acquisition, we will apply some basic concepts of Generative Grammar directly to German and English language samples and analyze these concepts contrastively where appropriate. Students will have the opportunity to discover the workings of these two languages with hands-on practice. This course is useful for students with linguistic grounding but also for novices and will be taught in English. No prior knowledge of German is needed.

 

LING 3400/7400 Structure of English

Fall 2014

MW 9-9:50, plus obligatory discussion section

Janay Crabtree

This course provides students with a foundation in the grammar of the English language. Topics include the phonology, morphology, syntax, with a focus on structural analysis. Students will gain confidence in discussing the form, function, and usage of linguistic structures. These topics will also be related to the teaching and tutoring of English as a second language including error correction and feedback. Fulfills the Structure requirement for the Linguistics major.

 

LING 5101 ESL Teaching Practicum: Language

Fall 2014

R 12:30-1:45

Elizabeth Wittner & Janay Crabtree

Through this 1-credit course, students focus on the topic of language in an L2, while gaining experience in the practice of English-language teaching to international students, faculty, and staff at the University. This experience is an excellent opportunity to gain teaching experience under the supervision of an experienced mentor. For every 1 hour of credit, students must meet with an instructor for 5 classroom & practice 33 hours.

 

LING 5102 ESL Teaching Practicum: Culture

Fall 2014

R 12:30-1:45

Elizabeth Wittner & Janay Crabtree

Through this 1-credit course, students focus on the topic of culture in ESL, while gaining experience in the practice of English-language teaching to international students, faculty, and staff at the University. This experience is an excellent opportunity to gain teaching experience under the supervision of an experienced mentor. For every 1 hour of credit, students must meet with an instructor for 5 classroom & practice 33 hours.

 

LING 5103 ESL Teaching Practicum: Writing

Fall 2014

Janay Crabtree & Jane Boatner

Through this 1-credit course, students focus on the topic of writing in an L2, while gaining experience in the practice of English-language teaching to international students, faculty, and staff at the University. This experience is an excellent opportunity to gain teaching experience under the supervision of an experienced mentor. For every 1 hour of credit, students must meet with an instructor for 5 classroom & practice 33 hours.

 

LNGS 3250/7010 Introduction to Linguistic Theory and Analysis

Fall 2014

MWF 11-11:50

Mark Elson

This course introduces sign systems, language as a sign system, and approaches to linguistic analysis which reflect this understanding of language (i.e., approaches which are sign-based, thus giving attention to meaning and communicative function as well as form). The analytic focus is the application of descriptive techniques to data from a variety of languages. This course is a requirement for the BA and MA in Linguistics. Graduate students should enroll in LNGS 7010, which meets concurrently with 3250, and for which instructor permission is required.

 

PSYC 5559 section 001 Neurobiology of Speech and Language

Fall 2014

TR 9:30-10:45

Daniel Meliza

Spoken language is a complicated, rich, and beautiful behavior. When you speak or listen, billions of neurons in your brain are engaged in translating between tiny variations in air pressure and the concepts, images, and memories they carry. How does this all come about? How do the circuits involved in speech and language work? How do neurons wire themselves together into circuits and learn how to produce and perceive speech? Did language suddenly happen to our species, or did it evolve out of simpler components that we can study in other animals? In this course, we will learn about mechanisms of speech and language by discussing a series of experimental animal models that exhibit constituents of language or speech, building towards behaviors that integrate multiple processes and culminating with a look at some of the data from human imaging studies. Open to 4th year majors or minors in Psychology, Cognitive Science, or Neuroscience. Also open to graduate students in Arts and Sciences.

 

RUSS 5030 Advanced Russian I

Fall 2014

MWF 9-9:50

Mark Elson

A thorough review of Russian grammar. Prerequisite: RUSS 2010, 2020, and instructor permission.

 

SPAN 7220 History of the Language

Fall 2014

TR 2:00-3:15

Joel Rini

This course is intended to provide the student with an introduction to the history of the Spanish language and to familiarize the student with the structure of Old Spanish in order to facilitate the reading of Old Spanish texts. The point of departure for class lectures and discussions will be selected texts, most of which come directly from the Spanish M.A. reading list. The grade will be based on several in-class exams. Fulfills historical linguistics requirement for the M.A. program.