2016-2017 Linguistics Courses

Spring 2017

AMST 3559/ MDST 3559  Language & New Media

TR 9:30-10:45

Ashley Williams

In this course we take an interdisciplinary approach to the investigation of how language both shapes and is shaped by American society with a specific focus on New Media. Drawing on critical and analytical tools and socio-cultural theories to examine this dynamic relationship, our examples are pulled from Twitter, Facebook, Snapchat, texting, Instagram, YouTube, and more. Through this, we explore questions surrounding issues such as moral panics and the feared degradation of language, literacy(ies), the global dominance of English, identity and self-presentation, the definition of community, and gossip and shaming. Course requirements include class participation, leading class discussion, regular reading responses, and a research project. Fulfills the Second Writing Requirement. NOTE: This is the course that will be offered for Spring 2017, not AMST 2462. If you have already taken AMST 2462, you should not register for AMST/MDST 3559.

 

ANTH 2430  Languages of the World

MW 10-10:50 + obligatory discussion section

Lise Dobrin

This course introduces students to the diversity of human language and the principles of linguistic classification. How many languages are spoken in the world, and how are they related? What features do all languages share, and in what ways may they differ? In surveying the world's languages, we will focus on the structure and social situation of a set of representative languages for each geographic region covered. We will also discuss the global trend of shift from the use of minority languages to large languages of wider communication, and what this means for the future of human diversity. Course work includes problem sets, essays, and a final paper on the linguistic features and social situation of a minor language. Prerequisites: one year of a foreign language or permission of instructor.

 

ANTH 2559  Language in Human Evolution

MW 9-9:50 + obligatory discussion section

Mark Sicoli

Examines the evolution of our capacity for language along with the development of human ways of cooperating in engaged social interaction. Course integrates cognitive, cultural, social, and biological aspects of language in comparative perspective. How is the familiar shape of language today the result of evolutionary and developmental processes involving the form, function, meaning and use of signs and symbols in social ecologies?

 

ANTH 3455/7455  African Languages

TR 11-12:15

Ellen Contini-Morava

This course is an introduction to the linguistic diversity of the African continent, with a focus on sub-Saharan Africa. For about three-fourths of the course we will discuss linguistic structures (sound systems, word-formation, and syntax) among a wide variety of languages; the classification of African languages; and the use of linguistic data to reconstruct prehistory. For the last fourth of the course we will address a range of sociolinguistic topics, including language and social identity, social functions of language, verbal art, the politics of language planning, and the rise of "mixed" languages among urban youth. While lectures address general and comparative topics, each student will choose one language to focus on, using published materials available in the library. This language will be the basis for the major assignments. Some prior experience with linguistics is desirable (such as LNGS 3250/7010, ANTH 2400 or ANTH 7400), but the course will also be accessible to highly motivated students who have not taken a previous linguistics course. Fulfills the Language Structure requirement for Linguistics majors and graduate students.

 

ANTH 3470/ MEST 3470/ ANTH 7470  Language and Culture in the Middle East

TR 12:30-1:20 + obligatory discussion section

Dan Lefkowitz

Introduction to peoples, languages, cultures and histories of the Middle East. Focuses on Israel/Palestine as a microcosm of important social processes-such as colonialism, nationalism, religious fundamentalism, and modernization-that affect the region as a whole. Prerequisite: Previous course in anthropology, linguistics, or Middle East Studies; or permission of instructor.

 

ANTH 3490  Language and Thought

MF 11-11:50 + obligatory discussion section

Eve Danziger

There is almost always more than one way to think about any problem. But could speaking a particular language make some strategies and solutions seem more natural than others to individuals? Can we learn about alternative ways of approaching the external world by studying other languages? The classic proposal of linguistic relativity as enunciated by Benjamin Lee Whorf is examined in the light of recent cross-cultural psycholinguistic research. This class fulfills the Linguistics requirement for Anthropology and for Cognitive Science majors. Fulfills the Theory requirement for Linguistics majors.

 

ANTH 5401  Linguistic Field Methods

M 5-7:30

Ellen Contini-Morava

The goal of this course is to get hands-on practice doing linguistic analysis based entirely on data collected from a native speaker of a language. [NOTE: “entirely” means that you should not look up already-published grammars and dictionaries or search the web for descriptions of the language we are working on. For the purposes of this course, we will act as if no grammar or dictionary yet exists.]  We will work collaboratively on the same language for the whole semester.  Data collection will begin with phonetic transcription of individual words, with the goal of learning to hear the phonetic detail of an unfamiliar language, and the first assignment will be an analysis of the phonemes of the language, including rules for allophonic variation where relevant. After working out the phonemic system, we will move to analysis of grammar (word structure and phrase/sentence structure), starting with phrases and sentences and going on to a short text. Fulfills the Language Structure requirement for Linguistics majors and graduate students. 

 

ANTH 5410  Phonology

T 4:30-7

Lise Dobrin

Phonology is concerned with the way speech sounds are organized as systems. Which sounds occur in a given language? What are the rules for their combination? How are they realized in different positions of a word or phrase? In order to answer these kinds of questions, we look not only at the patterning of segments, but also at the way that patterning is explained in terms of more basic properties, features. We look at higher level prosodic structures like syllables that group sounds into larger units. We also study aspects of the speech signal that are in principle independent of the segment, like stress, tone, and rhythm. In this course students gain experience analyzing phonological systems in a theoretically informed way. They learn to appreciate what kinds of problems the field of phonology aims to account for, to argue for solutions to such problems, and to understand the significance of their analyses in terms of the broader concerns of phonological theory. Coursework involves reading, class discussion, and solving homework problems. Fulfills the Theory requirement for Linguistics majors and graduate students. Prerequisite: LNGS 3250 or permission of instructor.

 

ANTH 5541  Discourse Prosody

M 2-4:30

Dan Lefkowitz

Graduate-level seminar in discourse prosody that examines intonation, rhythm, metricality, and voice-quality, and links these linguistic phenomena to dimensions of social life. We will begin with descriptive frameworks, including instrumental analytic techniques and transcription methodologies. The course will end on application of prosodic analysis to recorded examples of everyday conversation. Course assumes some knowledge of phonology.

 

ANTH 5559  Language Contact

W 2-4:30

Mark Sicoli

Considers how languages change when part of social systems and affected by historical processes. We will contrast language change through internal processes of drift and regular sound change with contact-induced language change involving multilingualism and code switching, language shift and lexical borrowing, the emergence of pidgin, creole, and intertwined languages, language endangerment, and computational tools for historical linguistics. Fulfills the Historical Linguistics requirement for Linguistics majors and graduate students.

 

EDHS 4030  Speech and Hearing Science

TR 5-6:15

Filip Loncke

The course examines principal concepts and procedures for the study of physiologic, perceptual and acoustic aspects of voice, speech and hearing. The course leads the student into the fascinating world of new applications in daily life, in business, and especially in education and clinical work.  

 

FREN 3030  Phonetics

MWF 12-12:50

Gladys Saunders

FREN 3030 is an introductory course in French phonetics. It provides basic concepts in articulatory phonetics and phonological theory, and offers students techniques for improving their own pronunciation. The course will cover the physical characteristics of individual French sounds; the relationship between these sounds and their written representation (orthography); the rules governing the pronunciation of "standard French"; the most salient phonological features of selected French varieties; phonetic differences between French and English sounds; and to some extent, ‘la musique du français’, i.e., prosodic phenomena (le rythme, l’accent, l’intonation, la syllabation). Practical exercises in 'ear-training' (the perception of sounds) and 'phonetic transcription' (using IPA) are also essential components of this dynamic course. Prerequisite: FREN 2020 (or equivalent). Course taught in French.

 

FREN 4509  Seminar in French Linguistics: The Wonders of French Pronunciation

MWF 11-11:50

Gladys Saunders

« Pourquoi la prononciation du français est-elle si compliquée? D’où vient cette prononciation? Comment a-t-elle changé à travers le temps? Comment varie-t-elle aujourd’hui? Où va-t-elle (peut-on prédire la direction du changement phonétique)? Pourquoi la liaison, les voyelles nasales et le schwa français (ce phonème énigmatique!) continuent-ils à attirer l’attention des chercheurs? Tant de questions, vous dites! Et comment y répondre? Eh bien, en suivant ce cours . . . »

This seminar sets out to find answers to these and other thorny questions seldom treated in depth in a single course.  Our aim is to gain a deeper understanding of how French pronunciation has evolved over time; and how it continues to function today, in the era of globalization when English is all pervasive, and when new changes are underway.   The seminar is intended for students who are fascinated by the complexities of French pronunciation and who are interested in expanding their knowledge of the subject beyond the confines of ‘wikipedia’.  Assignments will include the reading of specialized articles (in French and in English), projects involving the use of data from the PFC (Corpus du français contemporain, en ligne), TV5monde, and other spoken sources (e.g., early and current French audio recordings, oral interviews with French speakers, online (“pseudo-“) phonological analyses), and of course daily class participation.  The course is taught in French. Prerequisite: FREN 3030 (or LING 3250).

 

LING 5090  TESOL Theory and Method

TR 2-3:15

Janay Crabtree

This course provides an introduction to theories of second language acquisition (SLA), as well as methods and materials for Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL), particularly adult language learners. Students will be required to investigate current issues in the field of TESOL and SLA, and extend the knowledge to language learning observations and volunteering tutoring experiences. Recommended pre-/co-requisite: LNGS 3250 & LING 3400. These courses are not required, but they are recommended for students to have requisite background knowledge. Counts three credits toward the TESOL Certificate.

 

LING 5101  ESL Teaching Practicum: Language

W 1-2

Elizabeth Wittner

Through this 1-credit course, students focus on the topic of language in an L2, while gaining experience in the practice of English-language teaching to international students, faculty, and staff at the University. This experience is an excellent opportunity to gain teaching experience under the supervision of an experienced mentor. For every 1 hour of credit, students must meet with an instructor for 5 classroom & practice 33 hours.

 

LING 5102  ESL Teaching Practicum: Culture

TBD

Janay Crabtree

Through this 1-credit course, students focus on the topic of culture in ESL, while gaining experience in the practice of English-language teaching to international students, faculty, and staff at the University. This experience is an excellent opportunity to gain teaching experience under the supervision of an experienced mentor. For every 1 hour of credit, students must meet with an instructor for 5 classroom & practice 33 hours.

 

LING 5103  ESL Teaching Practicum: Writing

W 11-12

Jane Boatner

Through this 1-credit course, students focus on the topic of writing in an L2, while gaining experience in the practice of English-language teaching to international students, faculty, and staff at the University. This experience is an excellent opportunity to gain teaching experience under the supervision of an experienced mentor. For every 1 hour of credit, students must meet with an instructor for 5 classroom & practice 33 hours.

 

LNGS 5000  Linguistic Principles in Language Pedagogy

MW 8:30-9:45

Mark Elson

Goals of the course: 1. To discuss the concept of communicative competence, and to evaluate its involvement in current language instruction and second language acquisition. 2. Proceeding from there, to think critically about the goals and obligations of second language instruction at the college/university (as opposed to high school) level. 3. To provide a basic understanding of linguistic systems, their structure, diversity (through an encounter with Hungarian or Turkish), and complexity, proceeding from the assumption that such knowledge is the underpinning of good language pedagogy (i.e., that good language pedagogy proceeds from knowledge of the nature of linguistic systems, making it possible for instructors to anticipate difficulties and thus plan the impartation of L2 structure in an informed manner). Prospective enrollees should note that this is NOT a course in methodology. No prerequisites, but permission of the instructor is required.

 

PSYC 4120 Psychology of Reading

W 3:30-6

Beverly Adams

Analyzes the critical psychological experiments which have influenced the way that psychologists consider topics in reading, such as text comprehension, parsing, and sentence processing. Prerequisite: PSYC 1010 or 2150 or instructor permission. Enrollment is limited to advanced undergraduates in Psychology, Linguistics, Cognitive Science, or Speech and Hearing Science. Students may not simultaneously enroll in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course.

 

SPAN 3000  Phonetics

MWF 1-1:50 (Omar Velázquez-Mendoza)

MW 2-3:15 (Joel Rini)

TR 12:30-1:45 (Emily Scida)

Spanish Phonetics provides an introduction to the sound system of both Peninsular and Latin American Spanish. Class discussion focus on how the sounds of Spanish are produced from an articulatory point of view, and how these sounds are organized and represented in the linguistic competence of their speakers. When appropriate, comparisons will be made between Spanish and English or Spanish and other (Romance and non-Romance) languages. This course seeks to improve the student’s pronunciation. Prerequisites: SPAN 2020. Conducted in Spanish.

 

SPAN 3200  Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics

MWF 2-2:50

Omar Velázquez-Mendoza

This course offers a formal description of the Spanish language from the following angles of the linguistic discipline: language variation, change and acquisition; phonetics/phonology, morphology, and syntax. Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 or equivalent. Counts for major credit in Spanish and Linguistics. Conducted in Spanish.

 

SPAN 4530  Second Language Acquisition

TR 11-12:15

Emily Scida

How do people learn a second language (L2)? How are first language acquisition and second language acquisition different? Why are some learners more successful than others in learning a second language? How do we measure “success” in second language acquisition? How do we define “competence”? I invite you to join me in the exploration of these and other exciting questions. Together we will discover the processes and mechanisms that drive language acquisition by studying how three different areas – linguistics, psychology, and sociocultural perspectives – have contributed to the major theories and ideas informing the field of Second Language Acquisition. Prerequisites: SPAN 3010 and: SPAN 3000 or SPAN 3200 or another course in Linguistics. Conducted in Spanish.

 

 

Fall 2016

AMST 2462  Language & New Media

TR 9:30-10:45

Ashley Williams

In this course we investigate the interactional relationship between language and American society with a focus on New Media contexts. More specifically, we consider how language both shapes and is shaped by society in email, texting, Facebook, blogging, online gaming, YouTube, and more. Taking an interdisciplinary approach that draws from fields such as anthropology, linguistics, media & communication studies, psychology, and sociology, we turn our analytical and critical gaze to how social constructions (including race, gender, class, ideology, power, and youth) variably influence, are created by, and are realized in New Media genres. Fulfills the Second Writing Requirement.

 

ANTH 2400 Language and Culture

MWF 8-8:50

Michael Wenzel

A survey of topics having to do with the relationship between language, culture, and society. We will consider both how language is described and analyzed by linguists and how evidence from language can shed light on a variety of social, cultural, and cognitive phenomena. Topics include: nature of language, origins of language, how languages change, writing systems, use of linguistic evidence to make inferences about prehistory, the effects of linguistic categories on thought and behavior, regional and social variation in language, and cultural rules for communication. Satisfies the College Non-Western perspectives requirement.

 

ANTH 2420  Language and Gender

MW 4-4:50 + obligatory discussion section

Ellen Contini-Morava

In many societies, features of pronunciation, vocabulary choice, and/or communicative style are used as social markers of gender identity and differentiation.  We will take a cross-cultural perspective, comparing language use within the U.S. and in other parts of the world, especially non-Western societies.  Questions to be addressed include: How does language use reflect or construct a person’s sex, gender, or sexual orientation?  How do language differences, where they exist, contribute to the social construction of gender identity and difference in our and other cultures?  How do these differences, or the belief in differences, affect people’s lives/social identities?  What social factors besides gender relate to language differentiation, and how do they interact with gender? Is language itself sexist?  If so, what can or should be done about it?  Course requirements:  a group project recording and analyzing a segment of natural conversation; an individual paper;  reading checks;  participation in discussion;  a take-home final exam.

 

ANTH 2440  Language and Cinema

MWF 9-9:50

Daniel Lefkowitz

Looks historically at speech and language in Hollywood movies, including the technological challenges and artistic theories and controversies attending the transition from silent to sound films. Focuses on the ways that gender, racial, ethnic, and national identities are constructed through the representation of speech, dialect, and accent. Introduces semiotics but requires no knowledge of linguistics or film studies. 

 

ANTH 2470/ MEST 2470   Reflections of Exile: Jewish Languages and their Communities

MW 2-3:15

Daniel Lefkowitz

Considers Jewish languages Yiddish, Judeo-Arabic, Ladino, and Hebrew from historical, linguistic, and literary perspectices. Explores the relations between communities and languages, the nature of diaspora, and the death and revival of languages. No prior knowledge of these languages is required.

 

ANTH 3480/ 7480  Language and Prehistory

WF 9-9:50 + obligatory discussion section

Eve Danziger

This course covers the basic principles of diachronic linguistics – the study of how languages change over time – and discusses the uses of linguistic data in the reconstruction of prehistory. We will consider the use of linguistic evidence in tracing prehistory population movements, in demonstrating contact among prehistoric groups, and in the reconstruction of daily life. To the extent that the literature permits, examples and case studies will be drawn from the Mayan language area of Central America, and will include discussion of the pre-Columbian Mayan writing system and its ongoing decipherment. This course fulfills the linguistics distribution requirement for Anthropology majors and for Cognitive Science majors. It also fulfills the Historical requirement for the Linguistics BA and MA. 

 

ANTH 4420/7420  Theories of Language

TR 12:30-1:45

Ellen Contini-Morava

We will survey a number of modern schools of linguistics, both American and European, trying to understand each approach in terms of its historical context, the goals it sets itself, the assumptions it makes about the nature of language, and the relation between theory and methodology. Grades will depend on: four or five written homework assignments that ask you to look at some data from a particular theoretical perspective; a take-home, open-book final exam; and evidence (from class discussion) that you have been doing the readings, which are an essential part of the course. Fulfills the Theory requirement for Linguistics.

 

ANTH 5541-001   Topics in Linguistics: Multimodal Interaction

W 2-4:30

Mark Sicoli

Students will build knowledge and practice of the analysis of peoples’ joint-engagement in embodied interactions. We examine the history of the use of film and video in interaction analysis and the affordances of these media for examining spatiotemporal configurations of talk, techniques of body action, and tool use in social interaction. How does action weave together multiple sensory modalities into semiotic webs linking interactions with more durative institutions of social life? What are the theoretical consequences for an anthropology that takes the multimodal construction of meaning seriously? Course includes workshops on video recording, and the transcription and coding of both verbal and non-verbal actions. Transcript analysis “data sessions” will be conducted throughout the term, allowing student to hone their analytical skills for video analysis. Students will work on projects incorporating video production and analysis.

 

ANTH 7050  Ethnographic Data Analysis and Writing

T 7-9:30

Lise Dobrin

A seminar and writing workshop exploring methods of qualitative data analysis, styles of ethnographic description, and problems of research design. Students apply these techniques to the results of field research. In the Fall 2016 semester the focus will be on field research projects that investigate the role of language in cultural contexts. Enrollment is by instructor permission only.

 

ANTH 7400  Linguistic Anthropology

T 4:30-7

Lise Dobrin

This course is an advanced introduction to the study of language from an anthropological perspective. It presupposes no prior coursework in linguistics. The aim is to prepare graduate students to use what they learn in their own research. Topics include language structure, the nature of indexicality and the use of linguistic symbols, the linguistic shaping of worldview, language as a form of social action, ethnographic approaches to study of language, the meaningfulness of linguistic differences, storytelling in social life, and more. Students will explore the implications of these topics through readings, discussion, and an application of linguistic anthropological concepts to a particular ethnographic setting chosen in consultation with the instructor. The course fulfills the linguistics requirement for anthropology graduate students and the theory requirement for linguistics graduate students.

 

EDHS 4300  Psycholinguistics and Communication

TR 3:30-4:45

Filip Loncke

This course focuses on the psychological processes that underlie the acquisition and the use of language. There is an emphasis on the interaction between linguistic skills and other cognitive skills. The course also looks at flexibility of language and language use, and the influence of psycholinguistic processes on reading and writing, the social use of language, and language in other modalities. There will be a focus on learnability and teachability issues. Content: the course will provide insight in (1) acquisition and learnability,  (2) the biopsychology of language (neuro-linguistics, linguistic genetics) (3) the microgenesis of speech (the Levelt model), (4) perceptual processes, (5) expressive mechanisms, (6) multimodality, (7) bilingualism and variation, (8) interaction between language and cognition (9) a psycholinguistic approach to breakdown (i.e., pathology).

 

EDIS 7842  Teaching English Language Learners: Theory, Policy, and Practice

T 3:30-6

Amanda Kibler

This course is designed to provide you with a graduate-level overview to key issues related to the education of emergent bilingual and/or non-English background students in K-12 settings (often called “English language learners”) in the United States. We will explore second language acquisition theory, language policy, pedagogical approaches, and the practices of students and their teachers.

 

ENLS 3030  History of the English Language

MWF 11-11:50

Peter Baker

This course will introduce you to the history of the English language from several perspectives: we will be concerned with the language's "internal history" (what actually happened to its sounds, grammar and vocabulary). But we will also study how and why languages change and, more specifically, the "external history" of English (the cultural and historical contexts that have produced change). The course begins with the Indo-European and Germanic background of English, and we will spend some time with the language as it developed in the British Isles. In the second half of the term we will study the development of American English: its divergence from British English, the development of regional, racial and ethnic varieties, and the emergence in the twentieth century of a national "standard." At all times we will bear in mind that language is an aspect of social interaction, and when we study language change we are also studying social change.

 

FREN 3030  Phonetics: The Sounds of French

TR 11-12:15

TR 12:30-1:45

Gladys Saunders

FREN 3030 is an introductory course in French phonetics.  It provides basic concepts in articulatory phonetics and phonological theory, and offers students techniques for improving their own pronunciation.  The course will cover the physical characteristics of individual French sounds; the relationship between these sounds and their written representation (orthography); the rules governing the pronunciation of "standard French"; the most salient phonological features of selected French varieties; phonetic differences between French and English sounds; and to some extent, ‘la musique du français’, i.e., prosodic phenomena (le rythme, l’accent, l’intonation, la syllabation).  Practical exercises in 'ear-training' (the perception of sounds) and 'phonetic transcription' (using IPA) are also essential components of this dynamic course.                

Prerequisite: FREN 2020 (or equivalent). Course taught in French.

 

LING 3400/ 7400  Structure of English

MW 10-10:50 + obligatory discussion section

Janay Crabtree

This course provides students with a foundation in the grammar of the English language. Topics include the phonology, morphology, syntax, with a focus on structural analysis. Students will gain confidence in discussing the form, function, and usage of linguistic structures. These topics will also be related to the teaching and tutoring of English as a second language including error correction and feedback. Fulfills the Structure requirement for the Linguistics major.  

 

LING 5101  ESL Teaching Practicum: Language

W 1-1:50

Elizabeth Wittner

Through this 1-credit course, students focus on the topic of language in an L2, while gaining experience in the practice of English-language teaching to international students, faculty, and staff at the University. This experience is an excellent opportunity to gain teaching experience under the supervision of an experienced mentor. For every 1 hour of credit, students must meet with an instructor for 5 classroom & practice 33 hours.

 

LING 5102  ESL Teaching Practicum: Culture

Meeting Time TBA

Instructor TBA

Through this 1-credit course, students focus on the topic of culture in ESL, while gaining experience in the practice of English-language teaching to international students, faculty, and staff at the University. This experience is an excellent opportunity to gain teaching experience under the supervision of an experienced mentor. For every 1 hour of credit, students must meet with an instructor for 5 classroom & practice 33 hours.

 

LING 5103  ESL Teaching Practicum: Writing

W 11-11:50

Jane Boatner

Through this 1-credit course, students focus on the topic of writing in an L2, while gaining experience in the practice of English-language teaching to international students, faculty, and staff at the University. This experience is an excellent opportunity to gain teaching experience under the supervision of an experienced mentor. For every 1 hour of credit, students must meet with an instructor for 5 classroom & practice 33 hours.

 

LNGS 3250/ 7010  Introduction to Linguistic Theory and Methodology

MWF 11-11:50 + optional 1 credit discussion section

Mark Elson

This course introduces students to language as a system and the theoretical underpinnings of the analytic procedures used by linguists. It proceeds from the assumption that the goal of language is to communicate (i.e., to convey meaning via messages), and investigates assumptions relating to the manner in which it accomplishes this goal.

 

PSYC 5355  Neurobiology of Speech and Language

TR 11-12:15

Daniel Meliza

Spoken language is a complicated, rich, and beautiful behavior. When you speak or listen, billions of neurons in your brain are engaged in translating between tiny variations in air pressure and the concepts, images, and memories they carry. How does this all come about? How do the circuits involved in speech and language work? How do neurons wire themselves together into circuits and learn how to produce and perceive speech? Did language suddenly happen to our species, or did it evolve out of simpler components that we can study in other animals? In this course, we will learn about mechanisms of speech and language by discussing a series of experimental animal models that exhibit constituents of language or speech, building towards behaviors that integrate multiple processes and culminating with a look at some of the data from human imaging studies. Open to 4th year majors or minors in Psychology, Cognitive Science, or Neuroscience. Also open to graduate students in Arts and Sciences. Well-prepared 4th year Linguistics majors are also welcome.

 

RUSS 5030  Advanced Russian Grammar: Phonology and Morphology

MWF 9-9:50

Mark Elson

This course aims to provide a thorough review and elaboration of the spelling and inflectional morphology of Contemporary Standard Russian. Its aim is to help students, including those who are native speakers, acquire and consolidate a level of proficiency in the structure of Russian suitable for ordinary scholarly and instructional purposes at American universities. Although its content will help students in their preparation for the MA and PhD Russian Language Proficiency Tests at the University of Virginia, such preparation is not the goal of the course.

 

SPAN 3000  Phonetics

TR 11-12:15

Omar Velázquez-Mendoza

Spanish Phonetics provides an introduction to the sound system of both Peninsular and Latin American Spanish. Class discussions focus on how the sounds of Spanish are produced from an articulatory point of view, and how these sounds are organized and represented in the linguistic competence of their speakers. When appropriate, comparisons will be made between Spanish and English or Spanish and other (Romance and non-Romance) languages. This course seeks to improve the student’s pronunciation. Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 or equivalent. Conducted in Spanish.

 

SPAN 4203  Structure of Spanish

TR 2-3:15

Joel Rini

This is an advanced introduction to the study of fundamental aspects of the sound and grammatical systems of the Spanish language. The course will start by analyzing present-day (syllable, word and phrase) structures of the language and it will progress toward a more detailed examination of some of the linguistic processes and changes involved in the development of those structures. Prior coursework in linguistics is expected. Pre-requisites: SPAN 3010 and 3000 or SPAN 3010 and 3200. Fullfills the Structure requirement for the Linguistics major.

 

SPAN 7220  History of the Language

TR 2-3:15

Omar Velázquez-Mendoza

This course traces the historical development of the Spanish language (mainly) from its origins as a spoken Latin variety to the present. Topics include: The relationship between language change and language variation; the Indo-European language family; Romanization of the Iberian Peninsula; Classical vs. 'Vulgar' Latin; Spanish among the Romance varieties; Visigothic and Arab influence on the Spanish language; Latin and Medieval Spanish word order; Latin/Romance Diglossia in the High Middle Ages; Koineization in Medieval Spanish; Renaissance and Colonial Spanish. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. No previous coursework in linguistics required. Conducted in Spanish. Fulfills the historical requirement for the M.A. program.