Current Courses

Fall 2018

ANTH 2400          Language and Culture

MW 10-10:50 + obligatory discussion section

Mark Sicoli

A survey of topics having to do with the relationship between language, culture, and society. We will consider both how language is described and analyzed by linguists and how evidence from language can shed light on a variety of social, cultural, and cognitive phenomena. Topics include: nature of language, origins of language, how languages change, writing systems, use of linguistic evidence to make inferences about prehistory, the effects of linguistic categories on thought and behavior, regional and social variation in language, and cultural rules for communication. Satisfies the College Non-Western perspectives requirement.

 

ANTH 2430          Languages of the World

TR 9-9:50 + obligatory discussion section

Samuel Beer

This class introduces students to the diversity of human language. It surveys a range of similarities and differences shared by languages and presents three different ways that linguists use these similarities and differences to group languages together -- to classify them. In the course of a geographically organized tour of the world's languages, we will explore language families, language areas, and language types both large and small. For each region, we will focus on the structure and social situation of a set of representative languages. Finally, we will discuss the ongoing loss of linguistic and human diversity due to the global trend of shift from the use of minority languages to large languages of wider communication. Prerequisite: one year of a foreign language or permission of instructor.

 

ANTH 3470/MEST 3470/ANTH 7470     Language & Culture in the Middle East

TR 11-12:15

Daniel Lefkowitz

Introduction to peoples, languages, cultures and histories of the Middle East. Focuses on Israel/Palestine as a microcosm of important social processes-such as colonialism, nationalism, religious fundamentalism, and modernization-that affect the region as a whole. This course is cross-listed with MEST 3470. Prerequisite: Previous course in anthropology, linguistics, Middle East Studies or permission of instructor.

 

ANTH 5425          Language Contact

MW 2-3:15

Mark Sicoli

Considers how languages change when part of social systems and affected by historical processes. We will contrast language change through internal processes of drift and regular sound change with contact-induced language change involving multilingualism and code switching, language shift and lexical borrowing, the emergence of pidgin, creole, and intertwined languages, language endangerment, and computational tools for historical linguistics. Fulfills the Historical Linguistics requirement for Linguistics majors and graduate students.

 

ANTH 5485          Discourse Analysis

R 3:30-6

Daniel Lefkowitz

Discourse analysis looks at the patterns in language and language-use above the level of sentence grammar and seeks to apply the micro-level analysis of communicative interactions to understanding the macro-level processes of social and cultural reproduction. Topics include: symbolic interactionism, conversation analysis, critical discourse analysis, interactional sociolinguistics, discourse prosody, and digital analysis techniques. Instructor permission required.

 

ANTH 5541          Linguistic Typology

TR 12:30-1:45

Samuel Beer

This is a course on the study of the similarity and variation observed between human languages. We will address such questions as: How do languages vary from each other? What are the limits to crosslinguistic variation? What factors motivate these limits? After an overview of the structural units used to encode meaning in language, we will explore variation in morphology, variation in syntax, and the relationship between variation in the two domains. Finally, we will briefly survey typological approaches to other phenomena, including phonology, lexical semantics, and language death. Fulfills the Theory requirement for Linguistics majors and graduate students.

 

ANTH 5549          Language Socialization

W 5-7:30

Lise Dobrin

There is more involved in “learning a language” than acquiring knowledge of its grammatical structures; one also becomes an appropriate and skillful user of language as one is socialized, through communicative encounters with others, into becoming a competent member of a speech community. This course explores the topic of language socialization to reveal how language use at every level—from sound patterns to lexical choices to conversational routines—can contribute to learners’ understandings of what speech is and how it functions. At the same time, socializing encounters shape learners’ understandings of who they are and how they should act or feel, thereby serving as a locus for the transmission of culture. Readings will be drawn from diverse settings and regions of the world. Special attention will be given to language shift and other situations of social change and disjuncture. Course work will involve keeping up with the readings, participating in class discussion, and writing a paper on an individual topic of interest chosen in consultation with the instructor.

 

ANTH 7400          Linguistic Anthropology

T 3:30-6

Eve Danziger

An advanced introduction to the study of language from an anthropological point of view. No prior coursework in linguistics is expected, but the course is aimed at graduate students who will use what they learn in their own anthropologically-oriented research. Topics include an introduction to such basic concepts in linguistic anthropology as language in world-view, the nature of symbolic meaning, language and nationalism, universals and particulars in language, language in history and prehistory, the ethnography of speaking, the nature of everyday conversation, and the study of poetic language. The course is required for all Anthropology graduate students. It also counts toward the Theory requirement for the M.A. in Linguistics.

 

CLAS 3350/5559         Language and Literature of the Early Celts

MWF 2-2:50

Coulter George

This introduction to the Celtic inhabitants of Gaul and the British Isles interweaves two approaches, one linguistic, one literary. First, we will explore how the Celtic languages work, focusing on the basics of Old Irish—which includes such exotic features as initial mutations and conjugated prepositions—as well as touching on Middle Welsh and Gaulish. Second, we will compare writings about the Celts found in Ancient Greek and Latin authors with readings of Celtic literature in translation, notably Ireland’s closest equivalent to the Iliad, the Táin Bó Cúailnge, whose Achilles-like hero Cú Chulainn undergoes a monstrous transformation (called the “warp-spasm” by one translator) when he fights: “He sucked one eye so deep into his head that a wild crane couldn’t probe it onto his cheek out of the depths of his skull; the other eye fell out along his cheek.” Fulfills the Structure requirement for Linguistics majors and graduate students.

 

EDHS 4300          Psycholinguistics and Communication

TR 3:30-4:45

Filip Loncke

This course focuses on the psychological processes that underlie the acquisition and the use of language. There is an emphasis on the interaction between linguistic skills and other cognitive skills. The course also looks at flexibility of language and language use, and the influence of psycholinguistic processes on reading and writing, the social use of language, and language in other modalities. There will be a focus on learnability and teachability issues. Content: the course will provide insight in (1) acquisition and learnability,  (2) the biopsychology of language (neuro-linguistics, linguistic genetics) (3) the microgenesis of speech (the Levelt model), (4) perceptual processes, (5) expressive mechanisms, (6) multimodality, (7) bilingualism and variation, (8) interaction between language and cognition (9) a psycholinguistic approach to breakdown (i.e., pathology).

 

FREN 3030          Phonetics: The Sounds of French

TR 9:30-10:45

TR 12:30-1:45

Gladys Saunders

FREN 3030 is an introductory course in French phonetics. It provides basic concepts in articulatory phonetics and phonological theory, and offers students techniques for improving their own pronunciation. The course will cover the physical characteristics of individual French sounds; the relationship between these sounds and their written representation (orthography); the rules governing the pronunciation of "standard French"; the most salient phonological features of selected French varieties; phonetic differences between French and English sounds; and to some extent, ‘la musique du français’, i.e., prosodic phenomena (le rythme, l’accent, l’intonation, la syllabation).  Practical exercises in 'ear-training' (the perception of sounds) and 'phonetic transcription' (using IPA) are also essential components of this dynamic course. Prerequisite: FREN 2020 (or equivalent). Course taught in French; counts for major/minor credit in French and Linguistics.

 

GREE 1010          Elementary Greek

MWF 10-10:50 + obligatory discussion section

Coulter George

This course will introduce students to the fundamental building blocks of Ancient Greek, from the alphabet and the phonology of the language, through the rich array of morphology and syntax that allows nouns and verbs to be deployed with intricate flexibility, to the basic lexicon of a language that has bequeathed to English such words and concepts as democracy, history, theater, and epic—and, for that matter, phonology, morphology, syntax, and lexicon. While this is a language course rather than a linguistics course in the strict sense, linguistic concepts will inform the presentation of material throughout. This course is not offered for Linguistics credit but may be of interest to Linguistics majors and graduate students interested in historical linguistics.

 

LING 3400/7400     Structure of English

MW 9-9:50 + obligatory discussion section

Janay Crabtree

This course provides students with a foundation in the grammar of the English language. Topics include the phonology, morphology, syntax, with a focus on structural analysis. Students will gain confidence in discussing the form, function, and usage of linguistic structures. Students will also have an opportunity to research topics related to structure for presentation. Undergraduates will participate in group research projects, and graduate students will be expected to develop a conference-quality presentation. Where possible, topics will also be related to the teaching and tutoring of English as a second language including interlanguage analysis and feedback. This course fulfills the structure requirement for Linguistics majors and graduate students.

 

LING 5101          ESL Teaching Practicum: Language

W 1-1:50

Elizabeth Wittner and Janay Crabtree

As part of the TESOL Certificate Program, in this 1-credit course students focus on the topic of teaching oral English to speakers of other languages, while gaining experience in the practice of English-language teaching to international students, faculty, and staff at the University. This experience is an excellent opportunity to gain teaching experience under the supervision of an experienced mentor. Working with English language learners (ELLS) directly, students have a unique opportunity to apply their learning to their particular fieldwork context while reflecting on their ESL experiences in the practicum class. To prepare for, understand, and benefit the most from this experience, practicum students will read and discuss texts on pronunciation/intelligibility, aural English, structures, conversation, and and they will ground this theoretical knowledge in their work with ELLs as they address those very same issues with real learners. Practicum students will consider their experiences through short reflective assignments and periodic group meetings For every 1 hour of credit, students must meet with an instructor for 5 classroom & practice 33 hours. This course may be taken in conjunction with LING 5102 ESL Teaching Practicum: Culture.

 

LING 5102          ESL Teaching Practicum: Culture

TBD

Janay Crabtree and Elizabeth Wittner

As part of the TESOL Certificate Program, in this 1-credit course students focus on the topic of culture in ESL, while gaining experience in the practice of English-language teaching to international students, faculty, and staff at the University. This experience is an excellent opportunity to gain teaching experience under the supervision of an experienced mentor. Working with English language learners (ELLS) directly, students have a unique opportunity to apply their learning to their particular fieldwork context while reflecting on their ESL experiences in the practicum class. To prepare for, understand, and benefit the most from this experience, practicum students will read and discuss texts on intercultural communication, identity, and representation,  and they will ground this theoretical knowledge in their work with ELLs as they address those very same issues with real learners. Practicum students will consider their experiences through short reflective assignments and periodic group meetings.  For every 1 hour of credit, students must meet with an instructor for 5 classroom & practice 33 hours. This course may be taken in conjunction with LING 5101: ESL Teaching Practicum: Language.

 

LING 5103          ESL Teaching Practicum: Writing

W 11-11:50

Janay Crabtree

Through this 1-credit course, students focus on the topic of writing in an L2, while gaining experience in the practice of English-language teaching to international students, faculty, and staff at the University.  Students will develop writing lessons and plans,  tutor language learners in various writing venues, and learn and reflect on how to give effective feedback for different types of writing.  This experience is an excellent opportunity to gain teaching experience under the supervision of an experienced mentor. For every 1 hour of credit, students must meet with an instructor for 5 classroom & practice 33 hours.

 

LING 5409          Acoustic Phonetics

M 7-9:30

Samuel Beer

Spoken language involves two parties: speakers, who move around a range of organs between their lungs and their nose, and listeners, who derive meaning from a series of air molecules that crashes against their ear drums. This course investigates the intermediate phase in this mystifying process: the physical properties of the sounds produced by speakers and perceived by listeners. We will consider questions including: How do we produce speech? What are the physical properties of the speech sounds that we produce, and how to they differ from phoneme to phoneme? What physical properties do listeners attend to when trying to perceive speech? How do the processes of speech production and speech perception influence the sound patterns of language? We will also be acquiring practical perception and production skills and learning experimental and analytical techniques that enable us to address these (and other) questions.

 

LNGS 3250/7010     Introduction to Linguistic Theory and Analysis

MWF 11-11:50 + optional discussion section

Mark Elson

This course introduces students to language as a system and the theoretical underpinnings of the analytic procedures used by linguists. It proceeds from the assumption that the goal of language is to communicate (i.e., to convey meaning via messages), and investigates assumptions relating to the manner in which it accomplishes this goal. This course is required for all Linguistics majors and graduate students.

 

PSYC 3485/LASE 3500     The Science and Lived Experience of Autism 1 and 2

TR 9:30-10:45

Vikram Jaswal

This year-long, interdisciplinary seminar will explore how well the science of autism captures the experience of those living with autism and their families. Students will critically evaluate research in psychology, psychiatry, neuroscience, and education, and they will work together with members of the autism community to identify new research questions that reflect the interests and concerns of the people who are most affected by autism science. This course is not offered for Linguistics credit but may be of interest to Linguistics majors and graduate students.

 

PSYC 5559          Neurobiology of Speech and Language

TR 11-12:15

Daniel Meliza

An overview of the neural systems underlying production and perception of vocal signals, with an emphasis on animal models and their application to human communication. The course focuses on the primary literature, with an emphasis on developing critical reading and communication skills.

 

RUSS 5030          Advanced Russian Grammar: Phonology and Morphology

MWF 9-9:50

Mark Elson

This course aims to provide a thorough review and elaboration of the spelling and inflectional morphology of Contemporary Standard Russian. Its aim is to help students, including those who are native speakers, acquire and consolidate a level of proficiency in the structure of Russian suitable for ordinary scholarly and instructional purposes at American universities. Although its content will help students in their preparation for the MA and PhD Russian Language Proficiency Tests at the University of Virginia, such preparation is not the goal of the course. This course fulfills the structure requirement for Linguistics majors and graduate students.

 

SPAN 3000          Phonetics

MW 3:30-4:45

Omar Velázquez-Mendoza

Spanish Phonetics provides an introduction to the sound system of both Peninsular and Latin American Spanish. Class discussions focus on how the sounds of Spanish are produced from an articulatory point of view, and how these sounds are organized and represented in the linguistic competence of their speakers. When appropriate, comparisons will be made between Spanish and English or Spanish and other (Romance and non-Romance) languages. This course seeks to improve the student’s pronunciation. Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 or equivalent. Conducted in Spanish.

 

SPAN 4530          Spanish vis-à-vis Other Romance Languages

MW 2-3:15

Omar Velázquez-Mendoza

Drawing on a comparative approach to language change, this course traces the primitive origins and historical development of the major linguistic changes that took place in the passage from Latin to Spanish and other Romance (i.e., Latin-derived) languages, mainly Portuguese, Italian, and French. Topics to be explored include: Expected and unexpected phonological changes in the neo-Latin language continuum; the role of analogy and ‘contamination’ in language change; etymological and non-etymological nasalization; the object + verb to verb + object shift; the prepositional direct object; pronominal replacement and duplication of direct and indirect objects. Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 or equivalent AND SPAN 3000 or SPAN 3200 or any other linguistics course focusing on Spanish or on any other language.