Current Courses

Spring 2018

ANTH 2410              Sociolinguistics

MW 2-2:50 + obligatory discussion section

Ellen Contini-Morava

Every "single" living language is in practice an unbounded array of linguistic forms, functions, and feelings distributed unequally among speakers. Sociolinguists take such variety and inequality as starting points for investigating language as a crucially social phenomenon. In this introductory course, we will survey how languages vary across space and among social groups while also examining how spaces and social groups are themselves shaped by linguistic variation. We will be concerned throughout the semester with links between language and social inequality. No background in linguistics is presupposed.

 

ANTH 2430              Languages of the World

TR 10-10:50 + obligatory discussion section

Samuel Beer

This class introduces students to the diversity of human language. It surveys a range of similarities and differences shared by languages and presents three different ways that linguists use these similarities and differences to group languages together -- to classify them. In the course of a geographically organized tour of the world's languages, we will explore language families, language areas, and language types both large and small. For each region, we will focus on the structure and social situation of a set of representative languages. Finally, we will discuss the ongoing loss of linguistic and human diversity due to the global trend of shift from the use of minority languages to large languages of wider communication. Prerequisite: one year of a foreign language or permission of instructor.

 

ANTH 3490              Language and Thought

WF 10-10:50 + obligatory discussion section

Eve Danziger

There is almost always more than one way to think about any problem. But could speaking a particular language make some strategies and solutions seem more natural than others to individuals? Can we learn about alternative ways of approaching the external world by studying other languages? The classic proposal of linguistic relativity as enunciated by Benjamin Lee Whorf is examined in the light of recent cross-cultural psycholinguistic research. This class fulfills the Linguistics requirement for Anthropology and for Cognitive Science majors. Fulfills the Theory requirement for Linguistics majors.

 

ANTH 5401              Linguistic Field Methods

R 5-7:30

Ellen Contini-Morava

The goal of this course is to get hands-on practice doing linguistic analysis based entirely on data collected from a native speaker of a language that is unfamiliar to everyone in the class. [NOTE: "entirely" means that you should not look up already-published grammars and dictionaries or search the web for descriptions of the language we are working on. For the purposes of this course, we will act as if no grammar or dictionary yet exists.] We will work collaboratively on the same language for the whole semester. Data collection will begin with phonetic transcription of individual words, with the goal of learning to hear the phonetic detail of an unfamiliar language, and the first assignment will be an analysis of the phonemes of the language, including rules for allophonic variation where relevant. After working out the phonemic system, we will move to analysis of grammar (word structure and phrase/sentence structure), starting with phrases and sentences and going on to a short text.

 

ANTH 5490              Speech Play & Verbal Art

M 4-6:30

Daniel Lefkowitz

This seminar examines the linguistics and politics of poetics. We will explore cross-cultural and cross-linguistic diversity in ideas about what can be considered poetic in language, and we will link such formal analyses to ideas about what can be considered rhetorically effective and politically (or ideologically) powerful in language. Requirements will include seminar presentations and a research paper. Prerequisite: some coursework in both anthropology and linguistics; or permission of the instructor.

 

ANTH 5541              Linguistic Typology

TR 3:30-4:45

Samuel Beer

This is a course on the study of the similarity and variation observed between human languages. We will address such questions as: How do languages vary from each other? What are the limits to crosslinguistic variation? What factors motivate these limits? After an overview of the structural units used to encode meaning in language, we will explore variation in morphology, variation in syntax, and the relationship between variation in the two domains. Finally, we will briefly survey typological approaches to other phenomena, including phonology, lexical semantics, and language death.

 

ANTH 5549              Field Research in Linguistics

W 5-7:30

Samuel Beer

This course provides a theoretical, ethical, and logistical foundation for linguistic fieldwork. It contains three modules. In the first module, we will discuss the motivations for linguistic fieldwork. We will deal with the motivations of four different groups: the linguist, the academy, the public (who provide much of the funding for linguistic fieldwork), and, most importantly, the speech community. In the second module, we will discuss the logistics of linguistic fieldwork and the theoretical and practical consequences of logistical choices. Both linguistic and extralinguistic topics will be addressed. In the third module, we will consider data collected in the course of linguistic fieldwork as an artifact. We will address such questions as: Who owns it? How should it be stored? Who should have access to it? What is the relationship between linguistic data (whether in audio, video, or written format) and the languages that they purport to represent? Discussion of the ethical implications of the motivations, logistics, and outcomes of linguistic fieldwork will be interwoven through each of the three modules.

 

ASL 4750              Topics in Deaf Studies

MW 3:30-4:45

Christopher Krentz

This advanced seminar examines contemporary topics such as cultural versus pathological views of deaf people; the linguistics of American Sign Language; American deaf education; ASL poetry; Deaf visual art; controversies over reproduction and efforts to cure deafness; politics in the deaf community; deafness and other minority identities; interpreting and intercultural communication; and the international Deaf community. The class is taught in English with an interpreter; no prior knowledge of ASL or the Deaf community is required.

 

EDHS 4030              Speech and Hearing Science

TR 5-6:15

Filip Loncke

The course examines principal concepts and procedures for the study of physiologic, perceptual and acoustic aspects of voice, speech and hearing. The course leads the student into the fascinating world of new applications in daily life, in business, and especially in education and clinical work.

At the end of the course, the student will be able to (1) Explain the nature and propagation of sound in terms of its quantifiable parameters, types, and visual representations, (2) Describe the acoustics of vocal registers, vowels, consonants, and supra-segmentals in normal speech production, (3) Explain the psychoacoustics of normal auditory sensitivity and differential sensitivity, (4) Identify the acoustic cues sufficient and necessary for the perception of speech, and (5) Measure and determine acoustic characteristics as expression of gender, culture, and identity.

 

EDIS 7840              Discourse Analysis in Educational Settings

T 3:30-6

Amanda Kibler

This course provides an introduction to discourse analysis theory and methodology as they relate to classrooms and other educational settings. Readings will provide an overview of discourse analysis approaches used in educational research, with a particular focus on micro-ethnographic approaches. Fieldwork and hands-on analysis of discourse will form a significant portion of the course.

 

ENMD 5200              Beowulf

TR 11-12:15

Peter Baker

Reading of the poem, emphasizing critical methods and exploring its relations to the culture of Anglo-Saxon England. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses. Prerequisite: ENMD 5010 or equivalent. This course is not offered for Linguistics credit but may be of interest to Linguistics majors and graduate students interested in historical linguistics.

 

FREN 3030              Phonetics: The Sounds of French

TR 9:30-10:45

Gladys Saunders

FREN 3030 is an introductory course in French phonetics. It provides basic concepts in articulatory phonetics and phonological theory, and offers students techniques for improving their own pronunciation. The course will cover the physical characteristics of individual French sounds; the relationship between these sounds and their written representation (orthography); the rules governing the pronunciation of "standard French"; the most salient phonological features of selected French varieties; phonetic differences between French and English sounds; and to some extent, 'la musique du français', i.e., prosodic phenomena (le rythme, l'accent, l'intonation, la syllabation). Practical exercises in 'ear-training' (the perception of sounds) and 'phonetic transcription' (using IPA) are also essential components of this dynamic course. Prerequisite: FREN 2020 (or equivalent). Course taught in French. FREN 3030 counts for major/minor credit in French and in the Linguistics Program.

 

FREN 4509              Seminar in French Linguistics: L'individu bilingue / the bilingual speaker

TR 11-12:15

Gladys Saunders

Nearly half the people in the world speak more than one language every day; and in France, some 13 million speakers use regularly several languages. Yet, says expert (renowned psycholinguist) François Grosjean, "le bilinguisme reste méconnu et victime d’idées reçues" (especially in France where, historically, a linguistic policy of monolingualism has been promoted).

In this seminar we shall explore the many facets of the bilingual and bicultural individual (focusing particularly on the two languages that everyone taking the course will speak: French and English). Our guide will be Grosjean's 2015 book, Parler plusieurs langues: le monde des bilingues (an excellent analysis of the complex field for the French audience). Through our study of Grosjean and other sources, we will (1) gain insight into some of the persistent myths about bilingualism and bilinguals; (2) acquire deeper knowledge of the linguistic characteristics of the bilingual speaker (e.g., code switching, the principle of complementarity, language dominance, mixed linguistic systems, accent retention, problems in translating / interpreting . . .); (3) advance our understanding of how one becomes bilingual (linguistic and psycholinguistic aspects); (4) observe how others (writers, translators, artists, teachers, etc.) speak about bilingual/bicultural individuals in their work, and much more.

Students will conduct fieldwork, record and analyze oral interviews, give oral presentations and contribute daily to the in-class discussions on assigned readings and film clips. The seminar is taught in French. Participants must feel comfortable speaking French in the classroom, as well as outside the classroom (some field projects will require the use of French). FREN 4509 counts for major/minor credit in French and in Linguistics Program. PLEASE NOTE: FREN 4509 is coded as a repeatable class. This means that students who took FREN 4509 last spring may repeat FREN 4509 in spring 2018 for credit. The course number (FREN 4509) is the same but the seminar content is different.

 

LING 5090              TESOL Theory and Method

TR 2-3:15

Janay Crabtree

This course provides an introduction to theories of second language acquisition (SLA), as well as methods and materials for Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL), particularly adult language learners. Students will be required to investigate current issues in the field of TESOL and SLA to then extend and apply the knowledge to language learning observations and/or volunteer tutoring experiences. Demonstration of mastery of teaching methodology will be through development of materials or a learning tool for language learners dictated by student goals and interests. Students will be required to present this tool or course material in class. Recommended pre-/co-requisite: LNGS 3250 & LING 3400. These courses are not required, but they are recommended for students to have requisite background knowledge. Counts three credits toward the TESOL Certificate.

 

LING 5101              ESL Teaching Practicum: Language

W 1-2

Elizabeth Wittner & Janay Crabtree

As part of the TESOL Certificate Program, in this 1-credit course students focus on the topic of teaching oral English to speakers of other languages, while gaining experience in the practice of English-language teaching to international students, faculty, and staff at the University. This experience is an excellent opportunity to gain teaching experience under the supervision of an experienced mentor. Working with English language learners (ELLS) directly, students have a unique opportunity to apply their learning to their particular fieldwork context while reflecting on their ESL experiences in the practicum class. To prepare for, understand, and benefit the most from this experience, practicum students will read and discuss texts on pronunciation/intelligibility, aural English, structures, conversation, and they will ground this theoretical knowledge in their work with ELLs as they address those very same issues with real learners. Practicum students will consider their experiences through short reflective assignments and periodic group meetings For every 1 hour of credit, students must meet with an instructor for 5 classroom & practice 33 hours. This course may be taken in conjunction with LING 5102. ESL Teaching Practicum: Culture. Prerequisite: LING 5090 or permission from instructor.

 

LING 5102              ESL Teaching Practicum: Culture

TBD

Janay Crabtree & Elizabeth Wittner

As part of the TESOL Certificate Program, in this 1-credit course students focus on the topic of culture in ESL, while gaining experience in the practice of English-language teaching to international students, faculty, and staff at the University. This experience is an excellent opportunity to gain teaching experience under the supervision of an experienced mentor. Working with English language learners (ELLS) directly, students have a unique opportunity to apply their learning to their particular fieldwork context while reflecting on their ESL experiences in the practicum class. To prepare for, understand, and benefit the most from this experience, practicum students will read and discuss texts on intercultural communication, and they will ground this theoretical knowledge in their work with ELLs as they address those very same issues with real learners. Practicum students will consider their experiences through short reflective assignments and periodic group meetings. For every 1 hour of credit, students must meet with an instructor for 5 classroom & practice 33 hours. This course may be taken in conjunction with LING 5101: ESL Teaching Practicum: Language or LING 5103: ESL Teaching Practicum: Writing. Prerequisite: LING 5090 or permission from instructor.

 

LING 5103              ESL Teaching Practicum: Writing

W 11-12

Jane Boatner & Janay Crabtree

Through this 1-credit course, students focus on the topic of writing in an L2, while gaining experience in the practice of English-language teaching to international students, faculty, and staff at the University. This experience is an excellent opportunity to gain teaching experience under the supervision of an experienced mentor. For every 1 hour of credit, students must meet with an instructor for 5 classroom & practice 33 hours.

 

LNGS 2240              Southern American English

MW 2-3:15

Mark Elson

This course introduces students to the history and structure of the dialectology of the American South. It begins with Standard American English and the concept of standard language, proceeding to Southern Regional Standard, and then to a survey of the main points of structure of both Coastal and Inland (Appalachian) Southern. It concludes with a discussion of hypotheses relating to the history and sociolinguistics of Southern. There are two graded homework assignments and a final examination at the time scheduled by the University.

 

LNGS 5000              Linguistics Principles in Language Pedagogy

MW 8:30-9:45

Mark Elson

The goals of this course are: 1. To discuss the concept of communicative competence, and to evaluate its involvement in current language instruction. 2. Proceeding from there, to think critically about the goals and obligations of second language instruction at the college/university (as opposed to high school) level. 3. To provide a basic understanding of linguistic systems, their structure, diversity (through an encounter with Turkish), and complexity, proceeding from the assumption that such knowledge is the underpinning of good language pedagogy (i.e., that good language pedagogy proceeds from knowledge of the nature of linguistic systems, making it possible for instructors to anticipate difficulties and thus plan the impartation of L2 structure in an informed manner).

 

PSYC 4120              Psychology of Reading

W 3:30-6

Beverly Adams

Analyzes the critical psychological experiments which have influenced the way that psychologists consider topics in reading, such as text comprehension, parsing, and sentence processing. Prerequisite: PSYC 1010 or 2150 or instructor permission. Enrollment is limited to advanced undergraduates in Psychology, Linguistics, Cognitive Science, or Speech and Hearing Science. Students may not simultaneously enroll in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course.

 

SPAN 3000              Phonetics

TR 12:30-1:45

Omar Velázquez-Mendoza

Spanish Phonetics provides an introduction to the sound system of both Peninsular and Latin American Spanish. Class discussions will focus on how the sounds of Spanish are produced from an articulatory point of view, and how these sounds are organized and represented in the linguistic competence of their speakers. When appropriate, comparisons will be made between Spanish and English or Spanish and other (Romance and non-Romance) languages. This course seeks to improve the student’s pronunciation. Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 or equivalent. Conducted in Spanish.

 

SPAN 4203              Structure of Spanish

MW 2-3:15

Joel Rini

This is an advanced introduction to the study of the fundamental structures of the grammatical system of the Spanish language. The course will analyze present-day structures of the language as well as the linguistic processes and changes involved in the development of those structures. Prior coursework in linguistics is expected. Fullfills the Structure requirement for the Linguistics major.

 

SPAN 4210              History of the Spanish Language II

TR 2-3:15

Omar Velázquez-Mendoza

This course traces the historical development of the Spanish language from its origins as a spoken Latin variety to the present. Topics include: The relationship between language change and language variation; the Indo-European language family; Romanization of the Iberian Peninsula; Classical vs. 'Vulgar' Latin; Visigothic and Arab influence on the Spanish language; expected and unexpected outcomes of nasalization; Latin and Medieval Spanish word order; Golden Age and Judeo-Spanish; Colonial Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 and SPAN 3000 or SPAN 3200. Conducted in Spanish.

 

SPAN 4530              Second Language Acquisition

TR 11-12:15

Emily Scida

How do people learn a second language (L2)? How are first language acquisition and second language acquisition different? Why are some learners more successful than others in learning a second language? How do we measure "success" in second language acquisition? How do we define "competence"? I invite you to join me in the exploration of these and other exciting questions. Together we will discover the processes and mechanisms that drive language acquisition by studying how three different areas – linguistics, psychology, and sociocultural perspectives – have contributed to the major theories and ideas informing the field of Second Language Acquisition. Prerequisites: SPAN 3010 and: SPAN 3000 or SPAN 3200 or another course in Linguistics. Conducted in Spanish.

 

Fall 2017

AMST 2460          Language in the U.S.

TR 9:30-10:45

Ashley Williams

Contrary to popular belief, the U.S. is not (and never has been) linguistically homogenous: from dying and revitalized Native American languages to newly arrived immigrant languages, from regional and social dialect variation to innovation among adolescents and Hip Hop, the American language situation is diverse and changing. This course invites students to investigate this not-quite-melting-pot variety both through readings in current research and through small-scale field research. Topics covered in the course will include the origins and distinctions of American English, language controversies such as Ebonics and the English-Only movement, research in language attitudes and discrimination, topics in bilingualism and education, plus the latest studies in language issues involving different ethnicities, genders, sexualities, ages, and social classes. In this course we will pull material from a variety of sources (including films, literature, the media, and recent studies), and will employ a variety of approaches (linguistic, anthropological, sociological, historical, and more) as we investigate and debate what is uniquely “American” about the language situation in the United States. Fulfills the Second Writing Requirement.

 

ANTH 2400               Language and Culture

MW 10-10:50 + obligatory discussion section

Mark Sicoli

A survey of topics having to do with the relationship between language, culture, and society. We will consider both how language is described and analyzed by linguists and how evidence from language can shed light on a variety of social, cultural, and cognitive phenomena. Topics include: nature of language, origins of language, how languages change, writing systems, use of linguistic evidence to make inferences about prehistory, the effects of linguistic categories on thought and behavior, regional and social variation in language, and cultural rules for communication. Satisfies the College Non-Western perspectives requirement.

 

ANTH 2420               Language and Gender

MW 3:30-4:20 + obligatory discussion section

Ellen Contini-Morava

In many societies, features of pronunciation, vocabulary choice, and/or communicative style are used as social markers of gender identity and differentiation. We will take a cross-cultural perspective, comparing language use within the U.S. and in other parts of the world, especially non-Western societies. Questions to be addressed include: How does language use reflect or construct a person’s sex, gender, or sexual orientation? How do language differences, where they exist, contribute to the social construction of gender identity and difference in our and other cultures? How do these differences, or the belief in differences, affect people’s lives/social identities? What social factors besides gender relate to language differentiation, and how do they interact with gender? Is language itself sexist? If so, what can or should be done about it? Course requirements: a group project recording and analyzing a segment of natural conversation; an individual paper; reading checks; participation in discussion; a take-home final exam.

 

ANTH 2430               Languages of the World

MWF 9-9:50

Samuel Beer

This class introduces students to the diversity of human language. It surveys a range of similarities and differences shared by languages and presents three different ways that linguists use these similarities and differences to group languages together -- to classify them. In the course of a geographically organized tour of the world's languages, we will explore language families, language areas, and language types both large and small. For each region, we will focus on the structure and social situation of a set of representative languages. Finally, we will discuss the ongoing loss of linguistic and human diversity due to the global trend of shift from the use of minority languages to large languages of wider communication. Prerequisite: one year of a foreign language or permission of instructor.

 

ANTH 2440               Language and Cinema

MWF 11-11:50

Daniel Lefkowitz

This course takes a historical look at the role that speech and language have played in Hollywood movies. We will look at the artistic controversies, aesthetic theories, and technological challenges that attended the transition from silent to sound films as a backdrop to the main discussion of how gender, racial, ethnic, and national identities were constructed and reproduced through the representation of speech, dialect, and accent. This course provides an introduction to the study of semiotics but requires no knowledge of linguistics, or of film studies.

 

ANTH 2470/ MEST 2470     Reflections of Exile: Jewish Languages and Their Communities

MW 2-3:15

Daniel Lefkowitz

This course looks historically and comparatively at Jewish languages and the communities in which they have been used. We will explore general questions of the relationships among socio-cultural groups, their languages (or language varieties), and the literatures they produce by reading about Yiddish, Ladino, and Judeo-Arabic from literary, cultural, and historical perspectives. No prior knowledge of these languages is required.

 

ANTH 2541               Language, Culture, and Healing

TR 4-5:15

Anna Eisenstein

Healing takes place through a series of interactions – with one’s caregivers as well as with one’s own body and mind. In this course we will draw together works from linguistic anthropology and medical anthropology to explore the interplay of language and healing. We will map the ways particular therapeutic contexts, ways of speaking, and interactional roles configure medical authority and decision-making in a range of ethnographic settings.

 

ANTH 3455/7455   African Languages

W 3:30-6

Samuel Beer

This class explores the linguisitic diversity of Africa, with particular emphasis on Sub-Saharan Africa. We will survey the classification of the languages of Africa, their linguistic structures (sound systems, word-formation, and syntax), and the sociocultural setting in which they are spoken. Topics within these modules will include migrations and expansions of different language groups across Africa, the use of linguistic data to reconstruct prehistory, the incredible structural complexity of languages such as Shilluk (known for typologically rare stem alternations) or the Khoisan languages (known for their clicks), the effects of colonialism on language use, the loss of African languages as their speakers shift to larger languages of wider commununication, and more. While lectures address general and comparative topics, each student will choose one language to focus on, using published material available in the library. This language will be the basis for major assignments. Some prior experience with linguistics is desirable (such as LNGS 3250/7010, ANTH 2400, or ANTH 7400), but the course will also be accessible to highly motivated students who have not taken a previous linguistics course. Fulfills the structure requirement for Linguistics majors and graduate students.

 

ANTH 4420/7420    Theories of Language

TR 2-3:15

Ellen Contini-Morava

We will survey a number of modern schools of linguistics, both American and European, trying to understand each approach in terms of its historical context, the goals it sets itself, the assumptions it makes about the nature of language, and the relation between theory and methodology. Grades will depend on: four or five written homework assignments that ask you to look at some data from a particular theoretical perspective; a take-home, open-book final exam; and evidence (from class discussion) that you have been doing the readings, which are an essential part of the course. This course fulfills the theory requirement for Linguistics majors and graduate students.

 

ANTH 5475               Multimodal Interaction

MW 2-3:15

Mark Sicoli

Students will build knowledge and practice of the analysis of peoples’ joint-engagement in embodied interactions. We examine the history of the use of film and video in interaction analysis and the affordances of these media for examining spatiotemporal configurations of talk, techniques of body action, and tool use in social interaction. How does action weave together multiple sensory modalities into semiotic webs linking interactions with more durative institutions of social life? What are the theoretical consequences for an anthropology that takes the multimodal construction of meaning seriously? Course includes workshops on video recording, and the transcription and coding of both verbal and non-verbal actions. Transcript analysis “data sessions” will be conducted throughout the term, allowing student to hone their analytical skills for video analysis. Students will work on projects incorporating video production and analysis.

 

ANTH 7400               Linguistic Anthropology

M 3:30-6

Eve Danziger

This is an advanced introduction to the anthropological study of language. No prior coursework in linguistics is expected, but the course is aimed at graduate students who will use what they learn in their own anthropologically oriented research. Topics include an introduction to such basic concepts in linguistic anthropology as language and world-view, the nature of symbolic meaning, universals and particulars in language, language and social identity, the social construction of reality through everyday conversation, and the study of poetic language. Through readings and discussion, the implications of each of these topics for the general conduct of anthropology will be addressed. Evaluation is based on take-home essays and problem-sets which are assigned throughout the semester. The course fulfills the linguistics distribution requirement for Anthropology graduate students and the theory requirement for Linguistics graduate students.

 

CLASS 3300/5500              Introduction to Indo-European Linguistics

MWF 2-2:50

Coulter George

Languages as superficially different as English, Greek, Latin, and Sanskrit in fact all developed from a single “proto-language,” called Proto-Indo-European. This course will explore the following questions: What was this proto-language like? How do we know what it was like? By what processes did it develop into the various daughter languages? How can we trace words as diverse as wit, idea, video, and Veda back to a common source? Familiarity with Greek or Latin is recommended but not required. This course fulfills the historical linguistics requirement for Linguistics majors and graduate students.

 

EDHS 4300               Psycholinguistics and Communication

TR 3:30-4:45

Filip Loncke

This course focuses on the psychological processes that underlie the acquisition and the use of language. There is an emphasis on the interaction between linguistic skills and other cognitive skills. The course also looks at flexibility of language and language use, and the influence of psycholinguistic processes on reading and writing, the social use of language, and language in other modalities. There will be a focus on learnability and teachability issues. Content: the course will provide insight in (1) acquisition and learnability,  (2) the biopsychology of language (neuro-linguistics, linguistic genetics) (3) the microgenesis of speech (the Levelt model), (4) perceptual processes, (5) expressive mechanisms, (6) multimodality, (7) bilingualism and variation, (8) interaction between language and cognition (9) a psycholinguistic approach to breakdown (i.e., pathology).

 

ENMD 5010               Introduction to Old English

TR 11-12:15 

Peter Baker

This course will introduce you to English language and literature from before circa AD 1100-- the language of Beowulf, The Dream of the Rood, The Wanderer, and a number of other classics of medieval literature. We will begin with intensive study of the language (no prior knowledge of Old or Middle English is assumed) and the reading of simple texts. By the middle of the term we will have proceeded to more difficult prose texts and to poetry. Assignments will include (in addition to the readings) frequent exercises, bi-weekly quizzes, a final exam, and a short final paper. This course is a prerequisite for ENMD 5200, Beowulf.

 

FREN 3030                Phonetics: The Sounds of French

TR 11-12:15

TR 12:30-1:45

Gladys Saunders

FREN 3030 is an introductory course in French phonetics.  It provides basic concepts in articulatory phonetics and phonological theory, and offers students techniques for improving their own pronunciation.  The course will cover the physical characteristics of individual French sounds; the relationship between these sounds and their written representation (orthography); the rules governing the pronunciation of "standard French"; the most salient phonological features of selected French varieties; phonetic differences between French and English sounds; and to some extent, 'la musique du français', i.e., prosodic phenomena (le rythme, l'accent, l'intonation, la syllabation).  Practical exercises in 'ear-training' (the perception of sounds) and 'phonetic transcription' (using IPA) are also essential components of this dynamic course. Prerequisite: FREN 2020 (or equivalent). Course taught in French. FREN 3030 counts for major/minor credit in French and in the Linguistics Program.

 

LING 3400/ 7400                  Structure of English

MW 10-10:50 + obligatory discussion section

Janay Crabtree

This course provides students with a foundation in the grammar of the English language. Topics include the phonology, morphology, syntax, with a focus on structural analysis. Students will gain confidence in discussing the form, function, and usage of linguistic structures. Students will also have an opportunity to research topics related to structure for presentation. Undergraduates will participate in group research projects, and graduate students will be expected to develop a conference-quality presentation. Where possible, topics will also be related to the teaching and tutoring of English as a second language including interlanguage analysis and feedback. This course fulfills the structure requirement for Linguistics majors and graduate students.

 

LING 5101                 ESL Teaching Practicum: Language

W 1-2

Elizabeth Wittner & Janay Crabtree

Through this 1-credit course, students focus on the topic of language in an L2, while gaining experience in the practice of English-language teaching to international students, faculty, and staff at the University. This experience is an excellent opportunity to gain teaching experience under the supervision of an experienced mentor. For every 1 hour of credit, students must meet with an instructor for 5 classroom & practice 33 hours.

 

LING 5102                 ESL Teaching Practicum: Culture

TBD

Janay Crabtree & Elizabeth Wittner

Through this 1-credit course, students focus on the topic of culture in ESL, while gaining experience in the practice of English-language teaching to international students, faculty, and staff at the University. This experience is an excellent opportunity to gain teaching experience under the supervision of an experienced mentor. For every 1 hour of credit, students must meet with an instructor for 5 classroom & practice 33 hours.

 

LING 5103                 ESL Teaching Practicum: Writing

W 11-12       

Jane Boatner & Janay Crabtree

Through this 1-credit course, students focus on the topic of writing in an L2, while gaining experience in the practice of English-language teaching to international students, faculty, and staff at the University. This experience is an excellent opportunity to gain teaching experience under the supervision of an experienced mentor. For every 1 hour of credit, students must meet with an instructor for 5 classroom & practice 33 hours.

 

LING 5409               Acoustic Phonetics

TR 5-6:15

Samuel Beer

Spoken language involves two parties: speakers, who move around a range of organs between their lungs and their nose, and listeners, who derive meaning from a series of air molecules that crashes against their ear drums. This course investigates the intermediate phase in this mystifying process: the physical properties of the sounds produced by speakers and perceived by listeners. We will consider questions including: How do we produce speech? What are the physical properties of the speech sounds that we produce, and how to they differ from phoneme to phoneme? What physical properties do listeners attend to when trying to perceive speech? How do the processes of speech production and speech perception influence the sound patterns of language? We will also be acquiring practical perception and production skills and learning experimental and analytical techniques that enable us to address these (and other) questions.

 

LNGS 3250/ 7010                Introduction to Linguistic Theory and Analysis

MWF 11-11:50 + optional 1 credit discussion section

Mark Elson

This course introduces students to language as a system and the theoretical underpinnings of the analytic procedures used by linguists. It proceeds from the assumption that the goal of language is to communicate (i.e., to convey meaning via messages), and investigates assumptions relating to the manner in which it accomplishes this goal. This course is required for all Linguistics majors and graduate students.

 

RUSS 5030               Advanced Russian Grammar: Phonology and Morphology

MWF 9-9:50

Mark Elson

This course aims to provide a thorough review and elaboration of the spelling and inflectional morphology of Contemporary Standard Russian. Its aim is to help students, including those who are native speakers, acquire and consolidate a level of proficiency in the structure of Russian suitable for ordinary scholarly and instructional purposes at American universities. Although its content will help students in their preparation for the MA and PhD Russian Language Proficiency Tests at the University of Virginia, such preparation is not the goal of the course. This course fulfills the structure requirement for Linguistics majors and graduate students.

 

SPAN 3000               Phonetics

TR 2-3:15

Joel Rini

Spanish Phonetics provides an introduction to the sound system of both Peninsular and Latin American Spanish. Class discussion focus on how the sounds of Spanish are produced from an articulatory point of view, and how these sounds are organized and represented in the linguistic competence of their speakers. When appropriate, comparisons will be made between Spanish and English or Spanish and other (Romance and non-Romance) languages. This course seeks to improve the student’s pronunciation. Prerequisites: SPAN 2020. Conducted in Spanish.

 

SPAN 4202               Hispanic Sociolinguistics

TR 11-12:15

Omar Velázquez-Mendoza

This course examines the Spanish language within its social context by exploring the following topics: language versus dialect; the standard language; linguistic variation and its main variables: geography, gender, age, etc.; language variation and language change; language contact and bilingualism; Spanish in the US; code switching. Course conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 3200 or 3000.

 

SPAN 7220               History of the Spanish Language

TR 2-3:15

Omar Velázquez-Mendoza

This course traces the historical development of the Spanish language (mainly) from its origins as a spoken Latin variety to the present. Topics include: The relationship between language change and language variation; the Indo-European language family; Romanization of the Iberian Peninsula; Classical vs. 'Vulgar' Latin; Spanish among the Romance varieties; Visigothic and Arab influence on the Spanish language; Latin and Medieval Spanish word order; Latin/Romance Diglossia in the High Middle Ages; Koineization in Medieval Spanish; Renaissance and Colonial Spanish. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. No previous coursework in linguistics required. Conducted in Spanish. Fulfills the historical requirement for the M.A. program.